Hacker tool targets Windows NT

From the group that brought us the hacking tool Back Orifice will be a new release -- Back Orifice 2000, which is claimed to be smaller, nimbler and twice as nefarious.

The hacker group the Cult of the Dead Cow created and released the program Back Orifice last year to the general public at the Las Vegas hacker and security conference DEF CON. The program allows its users to remotely control victims' desktops, potentially undetected.

At this year's conference, on July 9, the cult will outdo itself and release Back Orifice 2000, says a member who goes by the pseudonym Sir Dystic. "We want to raise awareness to the vulnerabilities that exist within the Windows operating system. We believe the best way to do this is by pointing out its weaknesses."

Unlike earlier versions that affected consumers and small businesses, Back Orifice 2000 hits large organisations because it runs on Windows NT systems, which are more used by businesses. Also, the updated program is modular, so users can add additional functions. For example, they could hide files or activate a computer's microphone for real-time audio monitoring, according to Cult of the Dead Cow.

Back Orifice 2000 will also be more difficult to detect via network monitoring programs, according to Sir Dystic. This is because the program can communicate back to the sender by using a variety of different protocols, making it hard to identify.

The group also says it will make the source code available for Back Orifice 2000, which will likely spawn multiple strains of the program in the hacker community, experts say.

Another purported function is real-time keystroke-logging, which can record and transmit a record of every keystroke of an infected computer. Also, the recipient can view the desktop of a targeted computer in real time.

It should be noted that PC World has no independent confirmation that new Back Orifice 2000 program actually lives up to the claims of Cult of the Dead Cow.

BO2K busters

"We will be closely monitoring DEF CON to see what Back Orifice 2000 has in store for us," says Andrew Maguire, a product manager with Network Associates, which markets security and antivirus products. The company promises to provide customers with software protection for Back Orifice 2000, as it did with the original Back Orifice, if and when the program is released.

In the past, Microsoft has downplayed the risk of Back Orifice. The program poses no threat to users who follow what the company considers safe computing practices, according to the company.

Back Orifice 2000 is classified as a Trojan horse program. These programs are generally destructive and are hidden inside e-mail attachments, games, utilities, or any executable application. When run, a Trojan horse tries to do something harmful to your computer under the pretence of being useful.

Script kiddies

Security experts are worried about the proliferation of easy-to-use software tools that make it simpler for inexperienced hackers to break into sites. These so-called script kiddies, who use ready-made hacking software downloaded from the Internet, are creating a diversion from attacks made by more serious hackers, say experts.

Thousands of hacking programs are available on the Internet. Back Orifice is simply the most famous, Maguire says.

It's difficult to estimate how much damage hackers actually do. Some experts suggest it is overstated by a computer industry eager to sell safety services. Also, experts estimate 80 per cent of hacking comes from within a corporation rather than from outside attacks.

The upside of the teeming thousands of amateur hackers is that their prodigious efforts to hack into sites have forced software companies to provide security plugs and repairs to targeted software flaws, Cohen says.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Tom Spring

PC World
Show Comments

Essentials

Lexar® JumpDrive® S57 USB 3.0 flash drive

Learn more >

Microsoft L5V-00027 Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard Desktop

Learn more >

Mobile

Lexar® JumpDrive® S45 USB 3.0 flash drive 

Learn more >

Exec

Lexar® Professional 1800x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards 

Learn more >

HD Pan/Tilt Wi-Fi Camera with Night Vision NC450

Learn more >

Audio-Technica ATH-ANC70 Noise Cancelling Headphones

Learn more >

Lexar® JumpDrive® C20c USB Type-C flash drive 

Learn more >

Budget

Back To Business Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?