Tool converts .Net code to Java

  • (InfoWorld)
  • — 13 August, 2004 08:00

While Microsoft already has had a tool to migrate Java code to the company's .Net application development platform, Stryon is turning the tables.

Stryon's iNet product migrates applications and Web services from Visual Basic .Net, C#, and J# to Java without the need to rewrite the code, according to Stryon.

"The way the product works is that you take the Microsoft intermediate code and convert it to pure J2EE code," said Jim Stewart, CEO of Stryon. Major drivers for the product include users wishing to move .Net applications off Windows and over to Linux and consolidation of .Net applications on Linux-based mainframes, Stewart said. He said it is fast becoming the norm for shops to have both Java and .Net applications.

.Net applications distributed throughout an organization can be consolidated onto Java-enabled platforms in the datacenter, according to Stryon. Applications can be redeployed to Java application servers such as IBM WebSphere, BEA Systems WebLogic, or JBoss. Also, iNet can be used to enable supply chain partners to integrate their Java applications with an iNet user's business processes.

Developers using iNet can work with the Visual Studio.Net development tool without being tied to Microsoft's runtime, Stryon said. "With our tool, people really absolutely can stay in their Microsoft Visual Studio development environment," Stewart said.

iNet also converts .Net class libraries such as Core, ADO.Net, XML, and ASP.Net.

Stryon's offering counters Microsoft's own Java Language Conversion Assistant utility for moving Java code over to .Net. The Microsoft offering is free; Stryon charges for its software.

Stryon's iNet already is shipping. Prices range from US$995 for deploying to a Linux or Wintel system to US$9,995 for Unix deployment and US$19,995 for mainframe deployment. The product also is available for a free 30-day evaluation period at http://www.stryon.com

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Paul Krill

InfoWorld
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?