ISPs called on to bar 'nasties'

Internet service providers could lift their game when it comes to clamping down on malicious code such as worms, viruses and of course spam, according to McAfee chief security officer Ted Barlow.

While most offer third-party spam filtering, the time is fast approaching when anyone who uses an ISP could demand and expect "security in the clouds", Barlow said. Because ISPs and carriers currently share information about their networks and might see questionable activity two to three days before bad traffic - in the form of viruses or malicious code - becomes a problem for users, they could have a perfect early warning system.

"ISPs need to deliver connectivity and would help in the overall fight. Instead of value-adding their product, they might show better performance down the road," Barlow said.

"Why not stop something before it spreads to all machines as it moves through their (ISP) backbone?" he asked. If the problem could be stopped at the source or key points it would be a much better job.

"I think the best place to tackle the problem is with service providers; companies and individuals expect them to provide clean pipes without viruses, and I think consumers should also fairly soon be able to expect security in the clouds - of course people should put defences in place as baseline security, but they should also expect extra protection from service providers."

A spokesperson from Telstra said customers are provided with security platforms included in various Internet connection packages; however, it is a matter for customers whether or not they choose to install or use provided security.

"We warn customers on the dangers of the Internet and that is why we make security products available," the spokesperson said.

"However, if customers have sensitive information then a firewall at their end makes all the difference."

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Crawford

Computerworld

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?