Microsoft continues pursuit of software pirates

Microsoft launches a new Web site and files more lawsuits in its continued antipiracy efforts.

Microsoft Wednesday continued its efforts to stop people from pirating or using pirated versions of its software. The company launched a Web site and also revealed that it has filed 20 more lawsuits against people it claims are dealing counterfeit or pirated software in 13 states.

The new Web site provides information for how customers can tell whether software is genuine. It shows examples of suspicious packaging and other clues that can help alert users if they're buying the real deal or a fake copy of Windows or other Microsoft software.

Lawsuits were filed against alleged counterfeiters in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah and Virginia, Microsoft said. The company has been systematically investigating and filing lawsuits over the past two years against individuals or companies it believes is illegally counterfeit or pirated versions of its software.

Among the companies cited in the lawsuits as distributing software that infringes on Microsoft's intellectual property (IP) are F.A.R., Bisdex and Computer America in Alabama; Ben's Hobby Computers and Ram Computers in Georgia; Cyber Cycle in Illinois; TNT Auto Glass and Computer Repair in Mississippi; and Puterology in New York. SQL Server 2000, Windows XP Pro and Office 2003 Pro are among the software applications the companies allegedly are distributing illegally, according to Microsoft.

Wednesday's moves are part of Microsoft's Genuine Software Initiative (GSI), which the company launched in July 2005 to prevent pirated and counterfeited versions of Microsoft software being sold to users. The initiative has three parts -- education, engineering, and enforcement. According to some analyst reports, software companies lose billions of dollars every year to software pirates.

People have mixed views of Microsoft's efforts to prevent software pirating and counterfeiting. Some feel that the company's investigative measures are intrusive, such as Windows Genuine Advantage, an automated program that checks users' PCs automatically through Windows to see if they are running a genuine version of the software. Others say Microsoft is merely protecting its valuable IP and business interests by cracking down on software piracy.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Elizabeth Montalbano

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?