Teleportation: The leap from fact to fiction in a new movie

Actor Christensen, of Star Wars fame, and director Liman discuss teleportation with MIT professors

Fact met fiction Wednesday when a Hollywood actor and director sat down with two MIT physicists to compare the reality of teleportation to the special effects version in the upcoming movie, Jumper.

"It's a little less exotic than what you see in the movie," said Edward Farhi, director of the Center for Theoretical Physics at MIT. "Teleportation has been done, moving a single proton over two miles. [But] teleporting a person? That is pretty far down the line. The quantum state of a living creature is pretty formidable. That is just not in the foreseeable future."

It is, however, in the foreseeable future in the Hollywood world of lights and special effects. Jumper, which is scheduled to be released on Feb. 14, is a sci-fi thriller about a man, played by Hayden Christensen, who discovers he has the ability to teleport himself anywhere and at anytime. There's no old-fashioned Star Trek-like "Beam me up, Scottie" in this movie. The character simply wills himself to "jump" from one place to another.

Of course, nothing can be that easy in an action-adventure thriller. Christensen's character discovers that he's not the only Jumper alive and that there's a secret organization of people sworn to kill all Jumpers because they believe the teleporters' ability makes them a danger to everyone else. Actor Samuel L. Jackson plays the man in charge of tracking down, and killing, the Jumpers.

While the movie, directed by Doug Liman, may have taken the reality of teleportation and spiced it up quite a bit, Christensen, who gained fame and heart-throb status playing Anakin Skywalker in Star Wars Episodes II and II, told Computerworld that it's an alluring fantasy.

"I've always been a sci-fi fan. I like things that stimulate the imagination," he said before clips of the movie were screened for the MIT audience. "Obviously, I think there's great appeal to be able to be where you want, whenever you want. You could escape anything you need to escape."

And what situation would he like to teleport out of the most? "I might be home right now," he said, laughing. "Just kidding. Just kidding. Well, I'd at least like to be somewhere warm."

Liman, who joked about doubting his decision to go to MIT where the technology in his movie could be ripped apart, said he tried to find a source of reality in the science behind teleportation. "When we started Jumper, I got hooked up with a professor at the University of Toronto," said Liman, who traveled to 14 countries and 20 cities to make the movie. "He basically threw me out of his office. He didn't have much of a sense of humor about what we were doing."

The science still intrigues the director, who said he would recommend that would-be directors go to a school like MIT instead of film school. "Sitting here listening to your professors, I got five movie ideas in the bathroom and two ideas for sequels," said Liman. "This is where great ideas for films are born, so this is far more important than film school."

And the science obviously intrigues the professors and students at MIT, which may be one of the few places where professors get the same raucous hoots, foot stomping and cheers as the Hollywood star and a famed director. Farhi and Max Tegmark, an associate professor of physics at MIT, are the ones to separate fact from fiction when it comes to worm holes, time travel and teleportation.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sharon Gaudin

Computerworld

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?