Upgrade your laptop without going over the line

Tests reveal the optimal configuration for your laptop.

Buying a notebook computer can be an exercise in limitless possibilities, whether you're buying for yourself or for 250 users in your organization. That's because most laptop vendors offer a dizzying array of configurations.

Some people simplify matters by overspending, wagering that loading the laptop with unnecessary power is better than getting shortchanged on performance. Others underspend, assuming that it's better to save money than to pay for unneeded power.

Such uninformed decision-making, however, often leads to either underpowered or overpriced laptops. But who has time to test the major configuration choices to find out which offers the best balance of performance, price and battery life?

Well, I did.

To find today's notebook configuration sweet spot, I used a typical laptop to examine performance with six different levels of system memory, ranging from 512MB to 4GB. I also examined whether to use a traditional hard-disk drive (HDD) or a solid-state storage device (SSD) that uses flash memory.

I looked at the impact of these choices on both system performance and battery life.

Along the way, I learned several things about the trade-offs between performance, battery life and price. Here's what I discovered.

How much RAM is enough?

The first part of the laptop configuration conundrum is how much RAM to add to use. My tests found, not surprisingly, that adding more RAM leads to better performance. However, I also found the point at which adding RAM stops being cost effective and actually eats into the system's battery life.

Memory performance

60GB HDD 32GB SSD
512MB 2,607 2,562
1GB 2,704 2,780
1.5GB 2,7152,783
2GB 2,716 2,787
3GB2,774 2,782
4GB 2,798 2,810
Results shown are the memory scores from the author's PC Mark 05 tests. Higher is better.


Adding RAM is effective because it enables more of the system's operations to be done in the notebook's system memory. That, in turn, means less reliance on slower virtual memory, which uses the laptop's physical storage to simulate RAM when there is more data than the regular RAM can handle.

In my tests, filling the memory slots with 4GB increased memory performance -- how long it takes for data to go in and out of memory -- by about 7 per cent and increased overall system performance by 15 per cent compared with the test laptop's base configuration.

The biggest improvement, from a percentage point of view, occurred when increasing memory from 512MB to 1GB, but there was also a significant increase between 1GB and 1.5GB.

However, upgrading memory is effective only up to a point. That's because at some point the added memory isn't needed, and as a result, it sits idle and doesn't help with performance. That unneeded RAM does, however, draw power from the laptop's battery.

Battery life

60GB HDD 32GB SSD
512MB 4:55 5:15
1GB 4:50 5:05
1.5GB 4:45 5:05
2GB 4:405:00
3GB 4:35 4:55
4GB4:20 4:50
Results are in hours and minutes, rounded to nearest five minutes. Higher is better.

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Brian Nadel

Computerworld

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