Get Leopard and Windows to play nice

Mac OS X and Windows machines don't get along, right? Wrong. Try our tips for cross-platform happiness on your network.
  • (Computerworld)
  • — 11 September, 2008 09:42
Configuring a Mac to participate in a Windows network, step 2: In the Advanced Network Options dialog, click the WINS tab and fill in the NetBIOS name and the workgroup name. If a WINS server is used on the network, fill in the address.

Configuring a Mac to participate in a Windows network, step 2: In the Advanced Network Options dialog, click the WINS tab and fill in the NetBIOS name and the workgroup name. If a WINS server is used on the network, fill in the address.

  • Configuring a Mac to participate in a Windows network, step 2: In the Advanced Network Options dialog, click the WINS tab and fill in the NetBIOS name and the workgroup name. If a WINS server is used on the network, fill in the address.
  • If you're using Boot Camp to run Windows on your Mac, your hard drive has a Mac partition and a Windows partition. Paragon NTFS for Mac OS X gives the Mac partition full read-write access to an NTFS-formatted Windows partition.
  • Configuring a Mac to participate in a Windows network, step 1: In System Preferences, select the Network pane, choose an active network interface and click the Advanced button.
  • Sharing files on your Mac with Windows computers: First, go to the Sharing pane in System Preferences and check the File Sharing checkbox. Then click the Options button and choose to share files using AFP, FTP and/or SMB. If you choose SMB, specify which users will be allowed to connect to the Mac remotely.
  • Sharing printers: In the Sharing pane in System Preferences, check the Printer Sharing checkbox. Then open the Print & Fax pane in System Preferences, select the appropriate printer and check "Share this printer." Also, be sure SMB file sharing is enabled (see previous page).
  • The file browser in the latest version of Parallels lets you navigate and manage the contents of a virtual machine's hard drive image even if the virtual machine is shut down.
  • MacDrive for Windows gives your Windows partition full read-write access to your Mac OS X partition.

The simplest solution is to format your Windows partition as FAT32. But it's an older format that does not offer support for file and folder permissions or encryption, which means you have fewer options for securing your data. And with FAT32, you are more likely to encounter problems such as hard drive fragmentation, which can impact overall performance.

Finally, NTFS is a journaled file system, which provides greater error-checking options for the hard drive and reduces the risk of data loss if the computer is unexpectedly restarted.

If you want the advantages of NTFS and full access to your Windows files from within Leopard, you can install an NTFS driver for Mac OS X. There are two main options: MacFuse (a free port of the open-source Fuse tool that allows Linux systems to access NTFS drives) and Paragon NTFS for Mac OS X (US$39.95). Both are generally reliable solutions, though Paragon is more user-friendly, particularly for new or nontechnical Mac users.

The issues of accessing your Mac OS X partition from Windows are very similar. Windows does not have any built-in capabilities for reading the most commonly used Mac hard drive format types, which are variations on Apple's HFS+ format (also called Mac OS Extended).

In much the same way that MacFuse and Paragon NTFS allow full access to NTFS-formatted Windows partitions, Mediafour's MacDrive (US$49.95) allows Windows to access Mac-formatted drives and partitions, including the partition containing Leopard.

When using virtualization

What if you're using a virtualization tool instead of Boot Camp? Unlike Boot Camp's dual-boot approach, which requires restarting your computer to switch between operating system partitions, virtualization tools run Windows alongside Leopard on a single drive. Even so, accessing files and folders created in the other operating system can be tricky.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Ryan Faas

Computerworld
Topics: Windows, leopard
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?