IBM, Secret Service, others study identity/cybercrime issues

Center for Applied Identity Management Research organization teams experts in criminal justice, financial crime, biometrics, cybercrime and cyberdefense, data protection, homeland security and national defense.

IBM, LexisNexis and the Secret Service are among a group of corporations, government agencies and academic institutions that has formed to study and help solve identity management challenges around cybercrime, terrorism and narcotics trafficking.

The Center for Applied Identity Management Research (CAIMR) will study those issues and focus on developing real-world tools and best-practices recommendations to solve them.

The nonprofit research organization, which will be headquartered at Indiana University, brings together experts in criminal justice, financial crime, biometrics, cybercrime and cyberdefense, data protection, homeland security and national defense.

CAIMR will examine the challenges, knowledge gaps and research needed to solve identity issues in areas such as individual privacy, cybersecurity, and data breaches, and outline how those issues effect public safety, commerce, government programs and national security.

Gary R. Gordon, a senior scholar in identity management at Indiana University School of Law will be CAIMR's executive director.

In a statement, Michael Merritt, assistant director in the office of investigations for the U.S. Secret Service, said "Successfully combating emerging identity crimes requires that the Secret Service and law enforcement forge and enhance partnerships with industry, academic and research organizations."

The group has laid out four initial areas of study:

-- Public safety, which includes identity theft, cybercrime, computer crime, organized criminal groups, document fraud and sexual predator detection.

-- National security, including cybersecurity and cyberdefense, human trafficking and illegal immigration, terrorist tracking and financing.

-- Financial and corporate fraud, including mortgage fraud and other financial crimes, data breaches, e-commerce fraud, insider threats and healthcare fraud.

-- Individual protection, including identity theft and fraud.

CAIMR's founding members include Indiana University, the Secret Service, LexisNexis, IBM, Cogent Systems, Visa and Intersections, Inc.

Other members of CAIMR are Fair Isaac, University of Texas at Austin, Wells Fargo & Company, U.S. Marshals Service, Dragnet Solutions, ID Experts, Identity Theft Assistance Corporation, Information Technology Association of America, and National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

Tags identity managementIBMcybercrime

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

John Fontana

Network World

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?