StartLinxter developing 'Internet service bus'

A startup is readying a platform that will allow any Internet-ready application or device easily communicate with another.

A startup called Linxter is set to launch a hosted messaging platform that will enable any Internet-addressable device, application or system to communicate with another.

Linxter is stressing the platform's ease of use, and portraying Web-based connectivity as an increasingly natural condition of the world.

"With everything around us becoming Internet enabled (iPods, clothing, toasters... anything), it is essential that we have a system in place to securely, easily, and dynamically connect all these things," the Plantation, Florida, company's Web site states.

Founder and CEO Jason Milgram claimed in an interview that "Linxter is designed to where even a developer with one or two years of experience can master it in a day."

The platform consists of three components: an "Internet Service bus," which processes the messages being sent; a software development kit; and a Web interface for the administration of Linxter-enabled programs and user accounts. A .NET SDK is ready now and one for Java is in the works.

Linxter baked a series of security measures into the platform, including "endpoint to endpoint" encryption, according to its Web site.

Also, to improve the reliability of transferring larger files, the system will allow message chunking. "Let's say you are transferring a 100MB file, and after transmitting 70MBs you lose your Internet connection... when the connection is re-established, it picks up from where it left off," the site states.

Messages can be sent in a range of formats, such as plain text, XML, MIME and encrypted cipher text.

Developers could build a messaging system using frameworks like Microsoft's Windows Communication Foundation, but Linxter is going after a different customer segment.

"That definitely appeals to the large enterprise customers who have a large IT staff," Milgram said. "We believe our real target market are the SMBs that want to have this ability and doesn't want to have to build their own."

Linxter 1.0, set to launch in November, will be offered both as a hosted service and on-premises. Pricing for the hosted version will include a usage-based option as well as a flat rate. Enterprise license agreements for on-premises use will also be available.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags P2P

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?