Everything you need to know about Guitar Hero World Tour

... but were too afraid to ask!

152672-gh_world_tour_instruments_original

It packs in a sleek new wireless six-piece drum set with fan-like cymbals, a slap-strum pad on its 25 percent larger sunburst guitar, a stunning 86 master recording track list, and absolutely nobody, I repeat nobody, dies in this game. I'm talking about Activision Blizzard's Guitar Hero World Tour, of course, aka Take That, Rock Band !, an Extreme Instrumental Makeover for the series that launched a thousand armchair shedders, and it'll be available day one for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 2, and Nintendo Wii owners anywhere.

In case you've yet to rock out with a plastic piece and you're wondering what's up with this "music video game" thing, a word about Guitar Hero. Think back to when you were a kid and shameless, ready to bop and disco while your favorite song boogied in the background, plucking invisible strings on ethereal air guitars or upending empty ice cream buckets to slap along with the beat. Now imagine three or four buckets pinioned to a stand and that air guitar reified in plastic homage to Les Paul with a few colorful buttons poking out of the neck to trigger notes as they pop up on a TV screen and you're in the concert hall vicinity of what this whole faux rocker craze is all about.

Craze? Without a doubt. The Guitar Hero series alone has sold over 23 million units worldwide and cashed some $US1.6 billion in retail sales since it debuted in November 2005. By comparison, the Halo trilogy of games has sold around 20 million copies worldwide, and it's been around since November 2001.

Guitar Hero World Tour marks the fourth entry in a series that until now has been Strictly Guitars, allowing at most two players to cooperatively tackle guitar and bass parts or square off in head-cutting duels. That was plenty for the first waves of living room rockers -- until November 2007, anyway, when MTV Games released Rock Band, which audaciously added a drum set and microphone to the mix.

Guitar Hero purists balked at Rock Band's simplified gameplay and softer soundtrack, but the casually curious quickly climbed onto couches and enthusiastically plonked folding chairs in front of TV sets to group-jam songs like Bon Jovi's "Wanted Dead or Alive" and Foo Fighters' "Learn to Fly" and Blue Oyster Cult's "(Don't Fear) The Reaper." What's more, Rock Band offered roles for everyone. Guitar too complex? Try bass. Bass to easy? Try drums. Not rhythmically inclined? Grab the microphone, set it on "easy," then belt your ever-lovin' heart out. Plop spectators on your flanks singing backup and beer and pretzels on the coffee table and you were golden.

Guitar Hero World Tour amounts to Activision Blizzard's year-later group-friendly riposte, an attempt to one-up the Rock Band series with more sophisticated play modes and a full complement of streamlined instruments. For starters, the redesigned guitar's whammy bar has been extended to make it easier to grab and hammer, and the strum bar is both wider and quieter so you can theoretically rocket through power-rhythm stuff like Ozzy Osbourne's "Crazy Train" or Joe Satriani's "Satch Boogie" without burying the music in a blizzard of teeth-juddering clicks. Top that off with a tap pad that lets you play notes straight or "tap-strum" like you're slapping strings on an electric bass.

And then there's the drum set, which adds a whole new splashy vertical dimension. Rock Band's drum kit was four pads and a kick pedal, but World Tour adds cymbals to the mix along with velocity sensitivity (how hard or fast you strike the pads) so you can actually vary the sounds the drums make.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags guitar hero

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Matt Peckham

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Azadeh Williams

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

A smarter way to print for busy small business owners, combining speedy printing with scanning and copying, making it easier to produce high quality documents and images at a touch of a button.

Andrew Grant

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

I've had a multifunction printer in the office going on 10 years now. It was a neat bit of kit back in the day -- print, copy, scan, fax -- when printing over WiFi felt a bit like magic. It’s seen better days though and an upgrade’s well overdue. This HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 looks like it ticks all the same boxes: print, copy, scan, and fax. (Really? Does anyone fax anything any more? I guess it's good to know the facility’s there, just in case.) Printing over WiFi is more-or- less standard these days.

Ed Dawson

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

As a freelance writer who is always on the go, I like my technology to be both efficient and effective so I can do my job well. The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 Inkjet Printer ticks all the boxes in terms of form factor, performance and user interface.

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?