Stung by losses, Lenovo turns focus back to China

Hit by a sharp decline in sales and heavy financial losses, Lenovo Group's new management team is turning the company's focus back to China.

Hit by a sharp decline in sales and heavy financial losses, Lenovo Group's new management team is turning the company's focus back to China.

"With the changes in the macroeconomic environment, our business in EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa) and the Americas has been impacted greatly, so our company is increasing its focus on China, as well as emerging markets," Liu Chuanzhi, the company's newly reinstated chairman, told reporters during a conference call.

China is Lenovo's most important market, accounting for 45 percent of the company's sales during the most recent quarter.

Lenovo took observers by surprise on Thursday with the announcement that President and CEO William Amelio had resigned at the end of his three-year contract, which ended in December. Amelio, formerly the president of Dell's Asian operations, led Lenovo through an ongoing restructuring program designed to improve the company's competitiveness.

Amelio was replaced by Yang Yuanqing, who will step down from his current position as chairman of Lenovo to take on the CEO role. Liu, the company's founder and former chairman, returned to his former position and Rory Read, Lenovo's senior vice president of global operations, will take on the role of president and chief operating officer.

At the same time that Lenovo announced Amelio's departure, the company reported a quarterly loss of $97 million on sales of $3.6 billion, which represented a decline of 20 percent compared to the same period during the previous year. Whether a renewed focus on China will help Lenovo reverse its fortunes in the short term remains to be seen: the company singled out a drop in Chinese demand for PCs as a primary reason for the lower sales and financial losses.

"It's going to be tough in any of these markets, including China," said Bryan Ma, director of personal systems research at IDC Asia-Pacific. "Given their strength in China, I can understand why they want to focus on this area."

In terms of emerging markets outside China, Lenovo needs to focus its efforts on key markets, Ma said, noting that Lenovo's business in India suffered badly during the last quarter of 2008.

Lenovo's management also needs to realize that low prices alone will not be a guarantee of success in emerging markets. "It's more about value. It's critical they don't go into these markets looking only at price," Ma said.

Bringing Yang and Liu back to their previous positions echoes the earlier returns of Michael Dell to Dell and Steve Jobs to Apple during periods when these companies struggled to compete. But Yang and Liu, who ran the company at a time when its sales were largely confined to China, return to a dramatically different company, thanks to the 2004 acquisition of IBM's former PC division.

For the past four years, two Americans have held the CEO position at Lenovo, Amelio and predecessor, Stephen Ward, who became CEO immediately following the acquisition. Ward resigned in late 2005.

To be successful in their bid to revive Lenovo's fortunes, Yang and Liu will still have to improve the company's position in the worldwide PC market, not just in China. When Yang and Liu announced plans to acquire IBM's PC division, they said the deal would turn Lenovo into an international company and allow it to better compete against multinational vendors Hewlett-Packard and Dell.

That is still the company's goal, Liu said.

"We are enhancing our foundation in China so that we can have further development in the future in those mature markets. We will try our best to protect our market position in the U.S. and Europe," he said.

Yang echoed that sentiment. "I'm the CEO of this company. I still want this company to be a global company," he said.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags ChinaLenovo

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sumner Lemon

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?