Linux development lab opens

The Open Source Development Lab (OSDL), an 11,000-square-foot complex in Portland, Oregan, is backed by more than $US24 million in funding from industry sponsors including Intel , Hewlett-Packard, IBM, and NEC.

According to OSDL Lab Director Tim Witham, "anybody developing under an open-source licence can use the lab on a first-come, first-served basis.

"The purpose of the lab is to provide to the open-source development community the large-scale system resources it has been lacking up to now," Witham said. "Up to now, to work on this large a scale, you had to go to an HP or an IBM, and there you couldn't share information between those companies. [OSDL] offers a neutral, open environment for people working on open projects to get access to this equipment."

Fifty two-way servers, six four-way severs, an eight-way server, and more than 5 terabytes of available storage make up just some of the equipment that developers will have access to at the OSDL, Witham said.

One of the first projects the OSDL will tackle will be to successfully scale a 16-way, 64-bit open-source computer, Witham said. However Witham, a former Intel employee, added that while Intel is a founding sponsor of the OSDL, the lab's maiden 64-bit open-source project is not targeted at Intel's up-coming 64-bit Itanium processor.

"The goal [of the 64-bit project] doesn't specify any instruction set. The results will work on Itanium when the system comes out, but I can tell you that 98 per cent of the work is processor-independent," Witham said.

Computer Associates, Fujitsu, and Hitachi each joined as sponsors of the OSDL on the lab's first day.

Each of the OSDL's sponsors have their own Linux and open-source product offerings. And Witham said that other companies "participating in open source, should give something back [to the open-source community]" by becoming an OSDL sponsor.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Dan Neel

PC World

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?