25 computer products that refuse to die

Old computer products, like old soldiers, never die. They stay on the market--even though they haven't been updated in eons

Lotus 1-2-3

What it was: The world's most popular spreadsheet--the first killer app for the IBM PC, and the spreadsheet that replaced the original killer app, VisiCalc. It was also the flagship program in Lotus's SmartSuite, an office bundle that provided Microsoft Office with real competition in the mid-1990s.

What happened: A variant on the fates that befell WordPerfect, Harvard Graphics, and other major DOS productivity apps. Lotus thought that IBM's OS/2 would replace DOS, so it focused its energies on that OS, then had to play catch-up when OS/2 went nowhere and Windows caught on like crazy. Starting in the 1990s, it turned its attention to its Notes collaboration platform, and seemed less and less interested in desktop applications--especially after IBM bought Lotus in 1995. That gave Microsoft plenty of opportunity to make Excel competitive with 1-2-3 and leverage its place in the Microsoft Office suite. By the late 1990s, 1-2-3 was a has-been; Lotus last upgraded it in 2002.

Current whereabouts: IBM still sells that 2002 version of 1-2-3, which it cheerfully calls "the latest release." For $313, it throws in the other SmartSuite apps "as a bonus." But it's so disinterested in the product that made Lotus a software giant that when it recently introduced a new suite that includes a spreadsheet, it named that suite after a different old Lotus package--Symphony.

PageMaker

What it was: Aldus's groundbreaking desktop publishing application, launched in 1985. Along with Apple's Macintosh and LaserWriter laser printer, it made it possible for mere mortals to create professional-looking documents (as well as eyeball-searing monstrosities) for the first time.

What happened: PageMaker's decline was slow and multifaceted. As word processors gained respectable graphics capabilities, casual users had less need for PageMaker, and QuarkXPress offered more sophisticated tools for professionals. Adobe, which had acquired Aldus in 1994, lost interest in PageMaker and built its own publishing app, InDesign, from the ground up. In 2004, it announced that it would cease further development of PageMaker.

Current whereabouts: Over at Adobe's Web site, it's still selling PageMaker 7.0, which dates to 2002. The price: $499. It touts it as "the ideal page layout program for business, education, and small- and home-office professionals who want to create high-quality publications such as brochures and newsletters." Which is a darned odd claim to make about a program that's incompatible with all current Macs (it's an OS 9 application) and Windows Vista. Dig deeper, and you'll find Adobe's real opinion of PageMaker, which is--surprise!--that you should use InDesign instead.

After Dark

What it was: Berkeley Systems' screensaver for Macs and PCs, introduced in 1989 and most famous for its iconic flying toasters. Ask anyone to mention a specific screensaver, and the odds are 99.9999 percent that this is the one they'll mention. It spawned multiple sequels and spinoffs such as neckties and boxer shorts.

What happened: I'm not sure if I know, exactly, but I suspect the inclusion of fancy screensavers in the Mac OS and Windows and the availability of gazillions of free ones didn't help the market for commercial screensavers. (I still treasure my autographed copy of Berkeley Breathed's Opus 'n Bill screensaver, though--it includes a scene in which Bill the Cat shoots down flying toasters, which prompted a lawsuit.) Also, the theory that you needed a screensaver to prevent your monitor from burning in turned out to be hooey. Anyhow, Berkeley Systems' last After Dark outing was something called After Dark Games, in 1998; it wasn't even a screensaver.

Current whereabouts: Berkeley Systems is no more, but Infinisys, a Japanese company, sells a modern OS X version of After Dark. But not too modern: It doesn't work on Intel Macs.

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Harry McCracken

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