Intel grants $12M in multicore graphics research

Intel is giving $12 million over five years to Saarland University in Germany to use multicore computing for graphics

Intel on Tuesday said it was granting US$12 million over five years to Saarland University in Germany to research graphics technologies.

The funds will be used to form the Intel Visual Computing Institute, where researchers will investigate the use of multiple computing cores to create realistic graphics, said Megan Langer, a company spokeswoman.

The lab will focus on basic and applied research to develop programming models and architectures that boost computing using gestures, image recognition and life-like images. The research could be applied by software programmers to develop games, medical imaging or 3D engineering applications.

The investment is indirectly tied to writing software programs that tap into the power of Intel's upcoming Larrabee chip, which will include "many" x86 processor cores to deliver full graphics-processing capabilities. The graphics chip is the first Intel is targeting at the gaming market and industries requiring strong graphics and high-performance parallel processing.

Intel has not announced an official release date for Larrabee, though the company has said in the past it may come by 2010.

Adding more processing cores has emerged as the primary way to boost performance on chips. Many graphics card vendors offer many-core GPUs that can quickly process data-intensive applications like video decoding. Intel competitor Nvidia also offers a software tool kit that allows software developers to write programs for execution on its graphics cards.

Larrabee is part of Intel's terascale research program, which also involves the development of an 80-core chip code-named Polaris, a CPU that will be able to deliver more than 1 teraflop of performance.

Intel has already invested millions in academia to research multicore programming, but the investment in Saarland University is specifically for graphics technologies, Langer said. The company also has researchers in the U.S. and Europe doing similar work on graphics technologies.

Last year Intel and Microsoft committed $20 million to research centers at the University of California, Berkeley and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, to promote multicore software design over the next five years.

Tags germanyR&Dintel

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Agam Shah

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?