Oracle tries to ease concerns of Virtual Iron customers

VI's technology will be wrapped into Oracle VM within the company's fiscal year

Oracle is trying to reassure customers of Virtual Iron, the virtualization company it bought in May, as rivals like VMware push discount offers in hopes of capitalizing on any uncertainty.

Teams are working to combine VI's dynamic resource management and rapid server provisioning capabilities with Oracle VM, as well as to integrate the technology with Oracle Enterprise Manager, said Wim Coekaerts, vice president of Linux and virtualization engineering, during a webcast for customers.

"This is going to be an incredibly strong stack from top to bottom," he said.

The first results of this effort will come in Oracle VM 2.2, scheduled for release in Oracle's current fiscal year, which ends May 31, 2010. Full integration will come later in the fiscal year with Oracle VM 3.0, Coekaerts said. More specific dates weren't available.

Meanwhile, Oracle stopped selling the Virtual Iron product on June 30, and it is no longer available for download. Customers are being forced to remain on current versions unless they've already bought a newer one and simply haven't implemented it yet.

The company has also halted development on Virtual Iron's software in order to let engineers focus on the integration work, according to Coekaerts.

"By doing these things we'll be able to get the new product out sooner ... some of this might seem difficult, but we feel that we've made the right decisions," he said.

Virtual Iron had about 2,000 customers as of April 2008. Customers who move to Oracle VM won't incur new license costs, because the software itself is downloadable for no charge.

Oracle makes money by charging for support, using a pricing model tied to the number of server cores in use.

For customers who do decide to migrate to Oracle VM, the process "will not be seamless," Coekaerts said. "[You will] not just run an upgrade on an existing Virtual Iron product and be done."

Oracle is working on a migration tool to help lessen those chores, but it won't be available until after the 2.2 release.

Customers who are reluctant to stop using their VI products can get support from Oracle indefinitely, but this offer may have limited utility given the lack of product updates. For example, Oracle won't even be adding new hardware device driver support.

Existing VI implementations are also essentially frozen in size, given that Oracle is no longer selling the product.

Tags virtual ironOracle

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?