Palm releases Bluetooth software development kit

Palm's operating system division has launched a test version of a software development kit (SDK) for Bluetooth, allowing developers to make a start on building applications that work with the wireless networking standard, the company said Monday.

Only last week, Palm's device-making division said it has chosen Bluetooth wireless chips from Broadcom for use in future Palm models.

Palm hasn't yet revealed when the first devices using the Bluetooth chip will hit the market, but the company now has both hardware and software kits available for developers to use, said Michael Mace, Palm's chief competitive officer.

Bluetooth technology would let Palm users connect wirelessly to other Bluetooth-enabled devices, including cell phones, printers and other Palm computers, Mace said. Connecting to a cell phone would allow users to send and receive e-mail wirelessly using the phone as a modem.

The SDK beta, which is available free to registered Palm developers, includes Bluetooth configuration tools, documentation, sample code and Palm's Bluetooth API (application program interface), Mace said.

Palm also announced worldwide availability of its SDIO (secure digital input/output) hardware development kit, which includes two Palm SDIO Bluetooth cards, a serial cradle and the beta software development kit. The SDIO kit is available from Palm for US$199.

The SDIO Bluetooth cards fit into the SD expansion slot on Palm's m125, m500 and m505 models.

Other companies already offer hardware development kits (HDKs) for building Bluetooth "sleds," which slip onto a Palm to give it Bluetooth connectivity. Northstar Systems Inc. is taking pre-orders for its Palm Bluetooth HDK. The kit, for the Palm m125, m500 and m505 models, costs $199 and is scheduled to ship during the first week in February, the company said. Red-M Communications Ltd. already offers a Bluetooth developer's kit for the Palm Vx, priced at $199.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Douglas F. Gray

Computerworld

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?