In six years of Patch Tuesdays, 400 security bulletins, 745 vulnerabilities

Has Microsoft reached its limit for debugging software?

Microsoft's massive security update marked the completion of the sixth year of the company's move to a monthly patch release schedule.

Since moving to a monthly schedule in October 2003, Microsoft has released about 400 security bulletins based on an informal count of releases in its bulletin archives . The bulletins address about 745 vulnerabilities across almost every Microsoft product.

About 230, or more than half, of the bulletins addressed security vulnerabilities that were described by Microsoft as "critical." It's definition that Microsoft typically uses for vulnerabilities that allow attackers to take full administrative control of a system from a remote location.

More vulnerabilities are being discovered in Microsoft products these days than when the company first moved to a monthly patch schedule. The total number of flaws disclosed and patched by the software maker so far this year stands at around 160, more than the 155 or so that Microsoft reported for all of 2008. The number of flaws reported in Microsoft products over the last two years is more than double the number of flaws disclosed in 2004 and 2005, the first two full years of Patch Tuesdays.

The last time Microsoft did not release any patches on a Patch Tuesday was March 2007, more than 30 months ago. In the past six years, Microsoft has had just four patch-free months - two of them in 2005. In contrast, the company has issued patches for 10 or more vulnerabilities on more than 20 occasions and patches for 20 or more flaws in a single month on about 10 occasions, including yesterday.

The increase in the number of flaws being discovered comes at a time when attackers are getting much faster at exploiting them. A survey by security vendor Qualys earlier this year showed that 80 per cent of vulnerability exploits are available within 10 days of the vulnerability's disclosure. Nearly 50 per cent of the vulnerabilities patched by Microsoft in its security updates for April this year already had known exploits by the time the patches were available .

The numbers highlight Microsoft's continuing challenges on the security front, said David Rice, president of the Monterey Group, a security consultancy in Monterey, Calif. and author of Geekonomics: The Real Cost of Insecurity Software . But it is important to keep them in perspective, he added.

Other major vendors, such as Oracle Corp. and Apple Inc., have also announced large numbers of vulnerabilities over the past few years, Rice said. But neither of these two vendors has invested anywhere near the money and resources that Microsoft has spent on security over the past several years, largely because of the lack of incentive for them to do so, he said. Unlike other sectors, such as the automobile industry, where a vehicle's safety rating has an impact on product sales, software vendors have not been penalized by consumers for buggy software. So many have chosen not to invest in doing a better job of securing their products, he said.

"Apple and Oracle are classic examples of companies that have not invested in security to the same level that Microsoft has," Rice said.

David Jordan, chief information security officer at Virginia's Arlington County government, is growing impatient at the continuing number of flaws disclosed by Microsoft. "These updates are necessary, but the vulnerabilities they fix are most unwelcome," Jordan said.

"Much like auto recalls, one has to wonder how some of this stuff got to production so many years down the road," he said. "We've just recently retired our IBM mainframe, but back in the day, there was in software development a phrase known as 'zero tolerance for defects.' " Jordan said such an attitude toward software development would be welcome today, he added.

Microsoft's huge installed base and the popularity of its products make it a prime target for hackers looking for software vulnerabilities to exploit, which is one of the reasons so many of flaws continue to be found. "Microsoft has gargantuan cash reserves, and they are doing all they need to do. If they are still meeting with so much failure, it means they may have reached a glass ceiling" in terms of their ability to reduce flaws, he said.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags security patchMicrosoftsecurity

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jaikumar Vijayan

Computerworld (US)
Show Comments

Essentials

Lexar® JumpDrive® S57 USB 3.0 flash drive

Learn more >

Microsoft L5V-00027 Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard Desktop

Learn more >

Mobile

Lexar® JumpDrive® S45 USB 3.0 flash drive 

Learn more >

Exec

Lexar® Professional 1800x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards 

Learn more >

HD Pan/Tilt Wi-Fi Camera with Night Vision NC450

Learn more >

Audio-Technica ATH-ANC70 Noise Cancelling Headphones

Learn more >

Lexar® JumpDrive® C20c USB Type-C flash drive 

Learn more >

Budget

Back To Business Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Azadeh Williams

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

A smarter way to print for busy small business owners, combining speedy printing with scanning and copying, making it easier to produce high quality documents and images at a touch of a button.

Andrew Grant

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

I've had a multifunction printer in the office going on 10 years now. It was a neat bit of kit back in the day -- print, copy, scan, fax -- when printing over WiFi felt a bit like magic. It’s seen better days though and an upgrade’s well overdue. This HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 looks like it ticks all the same boxes: print, copy, scan, and fax. (Really? Does anyone fax anything any more? I guess it's good to know the facility’s there, just in case.) Printing over WiFi is more-or- less standard these days.

Ed Dawson

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

As a freelance writer who is always on the go, I like my technology to be both efficient and effective so I can do my job well. The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 Inkjet Printer ticks all the boxes in terms of form factor, performance and user interface.

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?