Free utility works to overcome SSD slowness

Data-buffering driver/utility FlashFire can be a godsend for owners of computers with slow SSDs.
  • (PC World (US online))
  • — 20 February, 2010 02:05

To understand why I love the tiny, free FlashFire utility/driver, you'll need a little background. I bought an original Acer Aspire One netbook with an 8GB solid state drive instead of a hard drive to keep the weight down. I replaced its custom Linux OS with XP--but XP, not being optimized for a super-slow SSD such as the one on my netbook, froze every half minute or so for 5 to 15 seconds while data was written to the disk. It's not long before such behavior starts driving you nuts.

All my tweaks to Windows to minimize disk writes helped but little. XP continued to stutter--until I installed FlashFire. Then, not only did the stuttering stop, XP booted considerably faster and the overall subjective performance amazed both myself and several of my colleagues who'd never seen a netbook perform that snappily.

The author's wiki describes FlashFire as a ram buffer. I'm not certain of the details, but since SSDs perform at their worst when reading and writing simultaneously, my guess is that the software caches and delays writes. Delaying writes means there's a small chance for data loss or file system corruption if your system crashes before data in the buffer is written. Personally, I have never experienced, nor have I ever heard of, anyone suffering significant problems with FlashFire. However, you are explicitly warned and use the software at your own risk.

Though Vista and Windows 7 don't suffer the same stuttering problem XP did, I've also used the FlashFire version for those OSs. Although it seemed to make operations perkier, those PCs didn't show the same jump in performance. However, the utility is free--so if you're stuck using a slow SSD or just want a bit better performance, check out FlashFire.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jon L. Jacobi

PC World (US online)
Topics: solid-state drives
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?