Google in waiting game for Chinese business license

Chinese official says content license is under review after a late filing, according to report

Google executives may have to wait a while to find out whether Chinese officials will renew the company's license to do business in the country.

China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology is still reviewing China's application to renew its content license and has not set a timetable for wrapping up the work, according to a report today in the Wall Street Journal .

"As Google submitted the application in late June, it is impossible to finish the examination in such a short time," Wang Lijian, a spokesman for the ministry, told the newspaper today.

In a statement, Google said today that "We've submitted our application, and we are waiting to hear from the Government."

The search giant filed an application to renew its Internet Content Provider (ICP) license on June 30, the final day that it could be submitted. The license expires in 2012 but must be renewed every year. Google cannot do business in China without the license.

Industry observers have speculated that Google may run up against some roadblocks considering its recent battles with the Chinese government.

In January, for example, Google threatened to halt its operations in China after charging that an attack on its network from inside China aimed to expose the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. At the same time, Google said it was reconsidering its willingness to censor the search results of users in China as required by the government.

After several months of negotiations with Chinese officials, Google announced in March that it had stopped censoring search results in the country.

In a blog post at the time, David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and Google's chief legal officer, said the company had stopped censoring Google Search, Google News and Google Images on the Chinese Google.cn site. Users in China were redirected to the Hong Kong-based Google.com.hk site, where they were given uncensored search results in simplified Chinese. Late last month, Google moved to assuage Chinese officials by halting the practice of automatically redirecting traffic to the Hong Kong-based site.

The company had been hoping for a more immediate decision about its license renewal.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Gov't Legislation/RegulationGooglesecurityregulationinternetgovernmentInternet SearchGov't Legislationsearch engines

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sharon Gaudin

Computerworld (US)

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?