Obama calls for permanent R&D tax credit

Tech groups applaud proposal for an expanded tax credit that would cost $US100 billion over 10 years

U.S. President Barack Obama has called on Congress to approve a permanent research and development tax credit for U.S. companies as part of a multibillion-dollar package intended to jump-start the nation's economy.

Obama, in a speech in Cleveland Wednesday, asked Congress to make permanent an R&D tax credit that has lapsed 13 times since 1981.

The tax credit and other proposals will help U.S. companies create jobs, Obama said. "I've never believed that it's government's role to create jobs or prosperity," he said. "I believe it's the drive and the ingenuity of our entrepreneurs, our small businesses, the skill and dedication of our workers, that's made us the wealthiest nation on earth."

Obama's proposal would expand the tax credit from about $US7 billion a year to about $10 billion a year over the next decade. The president's plan would also change the formula that businesses use to calculate their credit, with companies that use a simplified formula getting a tax credit of 17 per cent of R&D spending, instead of 14 per cent.

The proposal earned praise from several tech groups. Trade groups representing the tech industry have long pushed for a permanent R&D tax credit, but lawmakers have been reluctant to extend the credit because of its cost.

Every dollar spent on the tax credit generates two dollars of economic activity in the U.S., said Rey Ramsey, president and CEO of TechNet, a lobbying group representing tech CEOs.

"The R&D credit is one of the strongest tools our nation has to spur the cutting-edge innovation that will drive the creation of more American jobs," Ramsey said. "Now more than ever, American businesses need the certainty that comes with a permanent credit so they can plan their R&D investments over the long term instead of the current practice of yearly start-and-stop."

A permanent R&D tax credit will help several sectors of U.S. economy, added Evelyn Hirt, president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers-USA (IEEE-USA).

A permanent credit "would provide corporations some needed economic predictability in these turbulent times," she said in a statement. "The technologies U.S. companies develop or improve will ultimately have a positive effect on U.S. competitiveness, the growth of small businesses and job creation."

The R&D tax credit would be part of a spending and tax-cuts package estimated to cost $US180 billion to $350 billion. The proposal would include new spending for road and bridge repair, tax cuts for middle-class residents and a full tax deduction for capital expenditures at U.S. businesses through the end of 2011.

Obama would pay for the proposal by closing what he called some tax loopholes in other areas. He talked about tax breaks for U.S. corporations that move jobs overseas, apparently targeting rules in the tax code that allow U.S. corporations to pay the overseas tax rate on money earned outside the U.S. if that money stays outside the country.

"One of the keys to job creation is to encourage companies to invest more in the United States," he said. "But for years, our tax code has actually given billions of dollars in tax breaks that encourage companies to create jobs and profits in other countries. I want to change that."

The tax credit would replace "tax loopholes that incentivize investment in overseas jobs," he said.

Obama's speech in Cleveland comes as many pollsters are predicting huge losses for his party, the Democrats, in November's congressional elections. Obama ripped into Republicans, saying they have offered no new ideas for improving the economy.

Obama's plan may face opposition in Congress. House Republican Leader John Boehner, of Ohio, said Wednesday that Obama's proposals "fall well short" of what's needed to address problems of excessive government spending and tax hikes scheduled to happen in January, when cuts pushed by former President George Bush expire. Boehner called for a two-year freeze on tax rates and for legislation that would cut all government spending not related to security back to 2008 levels.

"The American people are asking the question, 'where are the jobs?'" Boehner said on the Good Morning America television show Wednesday. "If we're able to do this together, I think we'll show the American people that we understand what's going on in the country and we'll be able to get our economy moving again and get jobs growing in America."

Tech groups will fight hard for the R&D tax credit, which expired in December and hasn't been renewed, said Dean Garfield, president and CEO of the Information Technology Industry Council, a tech trade group.

"I have yet to meet a Democrat or a Republican who is opposed to making the R&D permanent, or at least expanding and improving the R&D credit," he said. "R&D is really the lifeblood of a knowledge-based economy."

Ramsey agreed. "This is smart policy and that a wide, bipartisan majority support a permanent credit," he said. "It would be unfortunate if politics or an election season would not allow approval of this important initiative to spur innovation."

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantusG. Grant's e-mail address is grant_gross@idg.com.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Information Technology Industry CouncilRey RamseyInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers-USAJohn BoehnerBarack Obamagovernmentlegislationgeorge bushtechnetEvelyn HirtDean Garfield

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Grant Gross

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?