Oracle, IBM hold hands on Java

The rivals have pledged to cooperate on OpenJDK for open source Java and to enhance the Java Community Process

Oracle and IBM, who are usually bitter rivals, pledged on Monday to collaborate on OpenJDK, which has served as the principal reference implementation of open source Java.

The two companies will make the OpenJDK (Java Development Kit) community the primary location for open source Java SE (Standard Edition) development. Collaboration between the two vendors also will center on the Java language, JDK, and Java Runtime Environment. Also, the JCP (Java Community Process) will continue to be the primary standards body for Java specification work, IBM and Oracle said. Both vendors plan to enhance the JCP.

[ Oracle mapped out its Java plans at the recent JavaOne conference. | Keep up with the latest Java developments with InfoWorld's JavaWorld Enterprise Java newsletter. ]

In a conference call, IBM's Rod Smith, vice president of emerging technologies, stressed IBM's newfound allegiance to OpenJDK and its partnership with Oracle. The collaboration, he said, "really starts to take away the uncertainty around the future of Java and where we are going with this."

"Our commitment to OpenJDK, we think, is going to be very good for the whole Java community, and I think we can help improve the pace of innovation," Smith said.

Previously, IBM had never been invited to participate in OpenJDK but worked on an alternative open source Java implementation, the Apache Harmony project. Oracle will continue working on Harmony, but IBM's main efforts will be directed toward OpenJDK, Smith said.

IBM and Oracle will support the recently announced OpenJDK development roadmap, for JDK 7 and 8. JDK 7 is set to feature enhancements like Java Virtual Machine performance improvements and new I/O APIS, while version 8 is slated to add small language enhancements and JVM start-up time and ergonomics improvements.

The IBM-Oracle partnership is about showing that the two largest players in Java are on the same page, said analyst Al Hilwa, of IDC.

"This is about showing that Java is still going to be invested in and that the two biggest players out there are in agreement that it must be evolved rapidly," Hilwa said. "More than that, that they are on the same page as far as the current roadmap, namely to have what was proposed initially as a single release has now become two quick releases, Java SE 7 and Java SE 8. I think it means that Oracle is very passionate about evolving Java and that they are willing to work with archrivals in good spirit to keep Java relevant and important."

Hilwa added he expects IBM and Oracle to fix the JCP and "make sure that it does not get bogged down with competing interests at the expense of the future of Java."

"Overall this is good news for Java developers," he said.

Oracle has been under fire from Java founder James Gosling for failing to put Java under the jurisdiction of an independent JCP, something Oracle supported in 2007 before it acquired Sun and Sun's treasure chest of Java technologies.  Asked about this pledge during Monday's conference call, Oracle's Adam Messinger, vice president of Oracle Fusion Middleware, hinted that there had been some discussion recently in this vein.

"There was a [JCP executive committee] meeting scheduled for last week, and it was very productive. We're not going to talk about what went on until the public minutes are released," which should be shortly, Messinger said.

OpenJDK was begun by Java founder Sun Microsystems, which was acquired by Oracle earlier this year. Sun began open-sourcing Java in late 2006.

This article, "Oracle, IBM hold hands on Java," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Follow the latest developments in business technology news and get a digest of the key stories each day in the InfoWorld Daily newsletter.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags application developmentLanguages and standardsDeveloper WorldIBMjavasoftwareOracle

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Paul Krill

InfoWorld
Show Comments

Essentials

Lexar® JumpDrive® S57 USB 3.0 flash drive

Learn more >

Microsoft L5V-00027 Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard Desktop

Learn more >

Mobile

Lexar® JumpDrive® S45 USB 3.0 flash drive 

Learn more >

Exec

Lexar® JumpDrive® C20c USB Type-C flash drive 

Learn more >

HD Pan/Tilt Wi-Fi Camera with Night Vision NC450

Learn more >

Audio-Technica ATH-ANC70 Noise Cancelling Headphones

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1800x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards 

Learn more >

Budget

Back To Business Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?