Oracle-SAP case takes dramatic eleventh-hour turn

SAP says it won't contest a claim of contributory copyright infringement and has asked to shorten the trial

Oracle's lawsuit against SAP has taken an unexpected turn four days before trial was due to begin, with SAP saying it won't contest charges that it contributed to acts of copyright infringement by its TomorrowNow subsidiary.

The development effectively removes one of SAP's defenses in the trial -- that its executives didn't know its TomorrowNow subsidiary had been stealing Oracle software. It could also reduce the likelihood that SAP executives will have to take the stand, according to one legal observer.

Oracle sued SAP in 2007 alleging that its TomorrowNow subsidiary stole software and support materials from Oracle's website, and that SAP used those materials to help lure away Oracle customers.

In a court filing Thursday, Oracle said it received a letter from SAP's lawyers late Wednesday night informing it that SAP has elected "not to contest the claim for contributory infringement," and that it will ask the court to cut the length of the trial almost in half. A speedy trial could lessen potential negative publicity for SAP.

"SAP management has insisted for three and a half years of litigation that it knew nothing about SAP's own massive theft of Oracle's intellectual property," Oracle said in a brief statement to reporters. "Today, SAP has finally confessed it knew about the theft all along."

Steve Chang, an attorney and principal shareholder with the IP law firm Banner & Witcoff, put it slightly less dramatically. The filing suggests that SAP no longer thinks it can prove at trial that its executives were unaware of TomorrowNow's illegal conduct, he said.

SAP has already admitted that TomorrowNow stole software and support materials from Oracle's website and has since closed the division. But SAP has maintained its executives knew nothing about the activity. Oracle had said it would present evidence to show that's not the case.

SAP can still argue at trial, as it had planned to, that Oracle did not incur significant losses because of TomorrowNow's activities, said Chang, whose law firm is not a participant in the case. "It doesn't mean an automatic win on the damages issue," he said.

But it means SAP may be conceding some culpability in addition to TomorrowNow's, and the trial will likely see a greater emphasis on SAP's profits -- instead of just TomorrowNow's profits -- as Oracle seeks to prove the extent of its damages, Chang said.

Oracle is seeking damages of about US$2 billion, while SAP says the damages should be no more than tens of millions.

An SAP spokesman had no immediate comment on the development.

Oracle's filing portrays the eleventh-hour move as an underhanded tactic that will require Oracle to "completely reconstitute" its presentation in court. Oracle therefore asked the court to delay the start of trial from Monday to Thursday, Nov. 4.

It argues it should still have the right to present evidence of SAP's knowledge of the TomorrowNow activity.

"In order to have a fair trial, Oracle must be able to demonstrate facts such as the extent of the infringement and SAP's role in, knowledge of, and business plans regarding that infringement," Oracle's lawyers wrote.

"These facts inherently relate to the fact and amount of damages appropriate in this case," they said. "In short, because of the nature of the damages proof, essentially all of the evidence that was important for liability is also relevant for damages."

Tags applicationslegalCivil lawsuitsSAPsoftwareOracle

Recommended

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

James Niccolai

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?