Kinect, Wii used to play Call of Duty in gadget mashup hack

A hack has a PC, Kinect and Wii Remote joining forces to take on the bad guys of Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.

So, you want to play some Call Of Duty on your PC? You could do that the old fashioned way, or you could spice things up a little by hooking your PC up to Microsoft's Kinect and Nintendo's Wii Remote for some added FPS awesomeness, One avid gamer has done just that, sharing the impressive results on YouTube for all to see.

YouTube user Demize2010 wanted to see just how far the Kinect's gesture support could be taken, and after a fair bit of tinkering the end result is a very-real and playable gesture-friendly FPS.

The impressive hack shows off the PC version of Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 being played with both a Kinect and a Wii Remote--now that has to be one gaming collaboration you thought you would never see.

With this hack, you would use Nintendo's Wii Nunchuck to move around within the game world. The Wiimote's built-in gyroscope controls aiming.

During gameplay you would use the Kinect to carry out various gesture-based in-game movements, such as leaning, ducking, reloading, and stabbing. For those more 'traditional gamers' out there, Demize2010 promised on his YouTube page that all the demonstrated gestures do work while sitting down too. Check it out.

Cool, huh? Sure, it may make gameplay a little slower paced than usual, but it offers an impressive glimpse at what can be achieved; so impressive in fact that many YouTube commenters have been calling the video a fake.

Demize2010's neat gaming feat was made possible due to the use of the FAAST toolkit, OpenNi/Nite tracking and programmable input emulator GlovePie.

You can find more videos of Demize2010's gesture-based FPS adventures on his YouTube page.

YouTube via

Like this? You might also enjoy...

Follow GeekTech and Chris Brandrick on Twitter, or check us out on Facebook .

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Game platformsMicrosoftgaminggamesXboxXBox 360wiiMicrosoft KinectNintendo

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Brandrick

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Cool Tech

D-Link TAIPAN AC3200 Ultra Wi-Fi Modem Router (DSL-4320L)

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q – Reign beyond virtual world

Learn more >

Crucial® BX200 SATA 2.5” 7mm (with 9.5mm adapter) Internal Solid State Drive

Learn more >

D-Link PowerLine AV2 2000 Gigabit Network Kit

Learn more >

Gadgets & Things

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >


Learn more >

Family Friendly

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

ASUS VivoPC VM62 - Incredibly Powerful, Unbelievably Small

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Best Deals on PC World

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.


Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?