Oracle stops developing software for Intel's Itanium chips

Intel says it remains committed to Itanium

Oracle on Tuesday became the latest software maker to say it will stop developing applications for Intel Itanium microprocessors, following a similar announcement by Microsoft last year and Red Hat the year before.

"After multiple conversations with Intel senior management, Oracle has decided to discontinue all software development on the Intel Itanium microprocessor," Oracle said in a statement late Tuesday. "Intel management made it clear that their strategic focus is on their x86 microprocessor and that Itanium was nearing the end of its life," the company added.

Nick Jacobs, a spokesman for Intel in Singapore, said the company "remains committed to Itanium."

The loss of Oracle, one of the world's biggest makers of enterprise software, is a blow to Itanium. The chip has an architecture different from Intel's mainstay x86-architecture, and companies have to write software code specifically for a chip architecture.

Microsoft said it planned to phase out software development for Itanium last April, just prior to the launch of Intel's Xeon 7500 chips. The Xeon 7500 series, which are x86-architecture chips, were the first Xeon chips to include high-end reliability features that Intel once reserved for Itanium, analysts said at the time, speculating that Microsoft simply no longer saw a reason to support Itanium once those features were installed in Xeon.

Red Hat dumped Itanium software development in late 2009.

Hewlett-Packard, which Oracle has battled with publicly over the past several months, is one of the major IT companies committed to Itanium-based servers. HP blocked a move by Oracle last year to subpoena its new CEO, Leo Apotheker, to appear in an Oracle versus SAP trial over alleged theft of software. Oracle, which won a US$1.3 billion verdict in the trial, had wanted Apotheker, former CEO of SAP, to testify at the trial.

SAP has asked a judge to reduce the size of the award.

Oracle said it will continue to provide support for existing customers of Oracle software that run on Itanium.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags business issuesapplicationssoftwareComponentsintelprocessorsOracle

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Dan Nystedt

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?