China's new IT authority could raise censorship

The new department will unify enforcement of the Web into one regulatory body
  • (IDG News Service)
  • — 05 May, 2011 01:01

China announced on Wednesday it had established a new department to oversee information on the Internet, in a move that could lead to more effective Web censorship.

The announcement came from China's State Council General Office. The department will carry out policies relating to how information is disseminated over the Internet. This includes supervising the management of Web information, along with Internet news services.

The department will also manage the development of gaming, video and publication industries on the Internet. It will also investigate and prosecute websites for violating laws.

The new department appears to be a move by the Chinese government to unify its enforcement of the Web into one regulatory body. Previously, several different government departments have had certain levels of jurisdiction over the Internet.

But in some instances, this has caused conflicts. In 2009, China's Ministry of Culture and the General Administration of Press and Publication were caught in a turf war over who had the authority to approve a "World of Warcraft" expansion pack.

In the government's eyes, these sorts of past disputes have highlighted the need for a strong unifying arm to administer the Internet, said Mark Natkin, managing director of Beijing-based research firm Marbridge Consulting.

"The new body should allow policy makers and top authorities to better coordinate the various regulatory bodies that oversee the Internet," he said. "This will allow for tighter regulations of the Internet."

China is one of the fastest growing Internet markets, with 457 million Web users, according to the China Internet Network Information Center. But in regulating the Internet, the country's government also strictly polices websites for politically sensitive content.

Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have all been blocked. At the same time, Chinese Internet censors will prevent users from posting or searching for information that's openly against the government.

In the last months, China's Web censorship has also increased to new levels, following an anonymous protest call made over the Internet, urging the Chinese people to start a "Jasmine revolution." Users have been barred from searching for the term "jasmine" on microblogs, while experts have said China is cracking down on human rights activists by blocking Gmail access in the country.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service
Topics: Government use of IT, regulation, government
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
Use WhistleOut's technology to compare:
Mobile phone plans & deals
Mobile phone models
Mobile phone carriers
Broadband plans & deals
Broadband providers
Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?