Startup targets flash memory latency

VeloBit claims its software will boost performance and lower costs with architecture compatible with any SSD or flash memory

Plenty of hardware vendors are pushing out Solid State Disk products to speed up data access. Now a startup is emerging from stealth mode with server software designed to make it easier to use SSD with existing storage systems and applications.

VeloBit has an undisclosed amount of first-round financing from Fairhaven Capital Partners and Longworth Venture Partners to continue building software currently available only in a private beta.

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VeloBit isn't providing a ton of detail about its software, but claims it will boost performance and lower cost with an architecture that can be used with any type of SSD or flash memory, while integrating with other storage systems and business applications. The company was founded in September 2010 and claims "inventions in caching, data compression and data tiering" that reduce latency.

"VeloBit is a performance booster for the storage you already own," the startup states on its website. "With VeloBit, you can deploy SSD without changing your applications or primary storage systems - preserving your investments in data protection and data management. VeloBit is easy to install, transparent to applications, and works with any block-based storage systems."

VeloBit is seeking an employee to lead development of its software for Windows, with a job listing asking for three years experience with Windows and five years experience with the C and C++ programming languages.

VeloBit's CEO is Duncan McCallum, who previously was in charge of Cilk Arts, which built tools for programmers to develop multi-threaded, parallel applications for multi-core processors. Cilk Arts was acquired by Intel in 2009.

VeloBit was previously known as Phast Data. A company profile published before the name change said its software would cost between $500 and $1,000 per processor while reducing latency by a factor of 10. (See also: Nine data storage companies to watc.h)

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Tags SSDnetwork storageConfiguration / maintenanceDrivesstoragehardware systemsVeloBitCapitaData CenterStorage Management

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Jon Brodkin

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