VMware's Maritz sees 'post-document' era

Huge streams of data will define hardware and change IT practices in the coming years, he said

The PC era is giving way to a world centered on data, where devices and infrastructure are shaped by the information that users want to get from them, VMware President and CEO Paul Maritz said on Wednesday.

"I do agree with Steve Jobs when he says we're at the beginning of the end of the PC era," Maritz said at the Gigaom Structure conference in San Francisco. "Perhaps, in the long term, [what is] more profound is the post-document era," he added. The PC was originally invented to automate a workplace where white-collar workers primarily created documents, but the main task for people today is filtering and distributing streams of data, he said during an on-stage interview with Gigaom founder Om Malik.

That data will determine what devices look like, rather than the other way around, because it will outlive any particular piece of hardware where it may reside, Maritz said. "All of us are going to be characterized by a body of individual information that's going to have to live with us our whole lives," he said. Meanwhile, there will be conflicts over who can control that data and make money from that data.

The lessons learned by consumer companies, such as Facebook, that are grappling with these problems will not be lost on mainstream IT departments.

"People already in that space have already had to evolve architectures that have to deal with data sets far larger than you find in the enterprise," he said. As a result, new data architectures such as Hadoop are migrating from big online companies to general enterprises, he said. Companies of all kinds want to become more efficient in how they run their infrastructures. Automation, in the form of moving workloads around a virtualized environment, is VMware's top priority, he said.

"We can't afford, this next time around, to write applications that have inflexible schemas that can't be scaled, and that require a new set of data paradigms," Maritz said. Developers have also adopted programming environments such as Ruby and Spring that provide scalability without their having to think about it, he added.

Greater efficiency has also found its way to VMware, where Maritz said he was proud that the company can come out with a major new release of its highly complex flagship software once a year. The next major version of Vsphere is due later this year, he said.

"If that release comes out on schedule -- which every indication is that it will -- it will actually be the first major system software release that I've ever been associated with that has actually shipped on time," Maritz said.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is stephen_lawson@idg.com

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags virtualizationVMware

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Stephen Lawson

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?