Hacking team claims NATO server compromised

The server's contents, which can be downloaded, contain confidential data, according to the hackers
  • (IDG News Service)
  • — 06 July, 2011 23:22

A group of hackers going by the name of the "Inj3ct0r Team" are claiming they've compromised a server belonging to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

The files were posted on the MediaFire file hosting site under the name "NATO Tomcat 5.5 Servlet Backup." A member of the Inj3ct0r Team contacted via e-mail by IDG News Service wrote that the files were a "server backup, confidential data."

Contained inside the files was a notepad document dated July 3 that said: "NATO lamers! I've been watching you day and night since then! W00t! Your Machines rooted! Servers restored to default! what else! [Expletive deleted] you and your crimes! and soon enough all your stupid ideas will be published on WikiLeaks!"

NATO's press office, contacted in Belgium on Tuesday, did not respond to a query by Wednesday afternoon.

The Inj3ct0r Team runs a website, http://1337day.com/team, that contains an archive of exploits that could be used to hack into a computer. It is not a unique list, as many security companies and organization compile similar information for researchers.

The Inj3ct0r Team, founded in 2003 according to its website, describes itself as a group of "hacktivists," a combination of the words "hacking" and "activists" that is generally used to describe hackers who break into computers for political reasons or other causes.

High-profile attacks on websites from those describing themselves as hacktivists have become increasingly common from groups such as Anonymous, which has kept up a strong hacking campaign against government websites and organizations.

Another group, called Lulz Security, recently disbanded after nearly seven weeks of attacks against websites of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, the U.S. Senate, the U.K.'s Serious Organised Crime Agency, the Brazilian government and the energy giant Petrobras, among others.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com

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Jeremy Kirk

IDG News Service
Topics: North Atlantic Treaty Organization, security, data breach, Exploits / vulnerabilities
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