Taiwan political party accusses China of hacking

Hacking attack allegedly originated from China's official press agency
  • (IDG News Service)
  • — 09 August, 2011 20:16

A Taiwanese political party suspects the Chinese government is behind a hacking attack that stole information about the party's election activities.

Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) said on Tuesday that some of the attacks had been traced to China's Xinhua News Agency, a state-run press group. The attack operated as a phishing campaign, in which DPP staffers were sent e-mails by hackers who attempted to impersonate other party employees. The staffers were then told to open the e-mail attachments, which secretly contained viruses to monitor the computers, a DPP spokeswoman said.

The DPP alleges the attacks were routed from the Xinhua News Agency through Malaysia and Australia. The attacks were also traced to IP addresses from the Chinese mainland. The Xinhua News Agency was contacted for response, but has yet to an issue a comment.

IT security experts have said the attacks were part of a state-sponsored hacking attempt, according to the DPP. "Already many countries and security groups have said the attacks from China's cyber army are well organized and that a state actor guides and supports them," the DPP said in statement issued on the party's website.

China is already in the spotlight for cyber attacks after security vendor McAfee reported a massive cyber attack that stole sensitive information from 72 companies and organizations. Although McAfee did not name the group behind the hacking attempts, security experts have pointed fingers at China because of the organizations targeted. China, however, has repeatedly denied it sponsors any kind of hacking.

A DPP spokeswoman said the phishing attacks have been an ongoing problem, but that it appears more of the recent hacking attempts have been coming from China.

Taiwan and China separated in 1949 after a civil war. While China's ruling communist party seeks for reunification with the island, the DPP supports Taiwan becoming its own nation, putting the two at odds with one another.

The DPP said on Tuesday it also traced hacking attempts to Taiwan's own Research, Development and Evaluation Commission and called for the commission to investigate. The commission could not be reached for immediate comment.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service
Topics: Government use of IT, mcafee, security, government, internet
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?