China stops fake Apple stores from using trademarks

The Chinese city of Kunming has been in spotlight for counterfeit Apple stores

The Chinese city of Kunming has stopped 22 fake Apple stores from illegally using the company's iconic trademarks after Apple lodged a complaint with authorities.

Kunming authorities found 20 unauthorized Apple resellers, according to a Friday posting made on the city government's website. Currently, 11 of those resellers are being investigated. Two other stores were discovered for related violations.

The city ordered all unauthorized Apple vendors to cease using the Apple trademarks by August 10, this past Wednesday. This included any decorative logos found on door entrances and clothes. All 22 stores complied with the demand.

Kunming authorities launched the investigation after Apple's Shanghai office sent a complaint about the fake stores on August 2, according to the government posting.

Apple did not respond to comment. Kunming's industry and commerce bureau could also not be reached.

News of Kunming's fake Apple stores appeared last month when a blogger posted photos from one of the vendors. The stores were built to closely match the decor of Apple's own official retail outlets, with employees even dressing similarly. The products sold, however, were said to be real.

Since the blog posting, the fake Apple stores have received unwanted attention from both the media and authorities. Kunming officials had launched an earlier investigation, in which they had found five unauthorized stores illegally using the Apple logo. Two stores were ordered to be shutdown.

Apple has become one of the most popular brands in China, according to analysts, with the company's products proving to be a hit among consumers. Last month, Apple COO Tim Cook said the company's revenue from China for this past quarter increased by more than six times from the same period last year.

But while Apple uses its own network of resellers in the country, the company only has four stores on mainland China, two located in Shanghai, the other two in Beijing. Long lines have formed at those retail outlets in the past when Apple launched its iPhone 4 and iPad 2 products, creating shortages for the products.

Tags Appleintellectual propertyregulationlegalgovernment

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?