Samsung shows off Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note tablet-phone crossover

Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7.

At the IFA trade show in Berlin, Samsung has thrown the covers off two new Galaxy tablets: the 7.7in Galaxy Tab 7.7 tablet and the 5.3in Galaxy Note tablet-phone crossover device.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7

Samsung today launched the successor to its original Galaxy Tab tablet, one year after first showing off the 7-inch Galaxy Tab at last year’s IFA trade show in Berlin. That Samsung would refresh that initial model, and bring its naming convention more in line with the other tablets in the company’s lineup, Galaxy Tab 10.1 and Galaxy Tab 8.9, was predictable. That Samsung would include a Super AMOLED Plus display on such a large screen was less of a given, but this move was no less welcomed.

A year ago, some had theorized that Samsung might include an AMOLED display on its first Galaxy Tab. But the company ended up not showing off its 7-inch Super AMOLED Plus display technology until November of 2010. The panels, actually 7.7-inch panels as they evolved into, went into mass production in August 2011, so the use of Super AMOLED Plus makes total sense for the next-generation 7-inch class Tab.

The display brings the benefits of Super AMOLED Plus (bright display, vibrant colors) together with a sharp resolution—1280 by 800 pixels. That makes it the highest resolution display on a tablet we’ve seen. So far.

The Tab’s introduction today, as with the Samsung Note, was a worldwide unveiling.

The Tab 7.7 packs a 1.4GHz dual-core processor (no word on the type of CPU) and Android 3.2v Honeycomb (not clear what the “v” stands for on the spec sheet, though this does include Samsung’s TouchWiz UX interface). Like Samsung’s other Galaxy Tab introductions this year, the 7.7 distinguishes itself with its slim and sleek design. The Tab 7.7 measures 7.89 millimeters thin, or 0.31 of an inch, practically 0.2 of an inch less than the original Galaxy Tab’s depth.

The new model is lighter, too: It weighs only 335 grams (0.75 pound), which shaves a full tenth of a pound off the weight of last year’s model, and makes this tablet one of the lightest tablets on the market. It also makes it the first tablet to seriously begin to close the gap between tablets and dedicated e-readers with E Ink displays. Granted, those now hover around the half-pound mark, but the Tab 7.7’s progress in shedding the weight is noteworthy, nonetheless.

Another less touted, but notable inclusion: Universal Remote Control functionality, so you can control your home entertainment system components directly from the tablet. (Presumably this is using a built-in IR blaster, but that wasn’t specified on the available spec information.) After using such functionality on the new Sony Tablet S, I’m convinced this will be one of the must-have features for a tablet going forward.

The connectivity options in this model are strong. The Tab 7.7 supports HSPA+ 21Mbps network, Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n (on both 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands), and support Wi-Fi Channel Bonding for improved Wi-Fi performance. As announced in this worldwide version, like the original Tab, the Tab 7.7 does support voice calls.

Samsung says the Tab 7.7’s 5,100 mAh battery will provide up to 10 hours of video playback.

The unit will come in 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB capacities, with a microSD card slot on board for up to 32GB of files. The cautious language of Samsung’s press release indicates a dangerous trend forming, though. The company specifies the microSD card slot is for “direct media files transfer” only, something that Sony did with its Tablet S as well.

Reporting by Melissa J. Perenson, PC World US.

Next page: The Samsung Galaxy Note

Tags samsungtablets

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Campbell Simpson

Campbell Simpson

Good Gear Guide

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