MySQL.com hacked to serve malware

A Russian hacker said he would sell root access to the domain for $3,000

The website for the open-source MySQL database was hacked and used to serve malware to visitors Monday.

Security vendor Armorize noticed the problem at around 5 a.m. Pacific Time Monday. Hackers had installed JavaScript code that threw a variety of known browser attacks at visitors to the site, so those with out-of-date browsers or unpatched versions of Adobe Flash, Reader or Java on their Windows PCs could have been quietly infected with malicious software.

By just after 11 a.m., the issue had been cleaned up, said Wayne Huang, Armorize's CEO. He thinks the malicious code was on the site for less than a day.

Huang said that the attackers used the Black Hole exploit kit to attack visitors to the site, but his team had not yet figured out what the malicious software that it installed was designed to do. Typically, criminals install malware to steal victims' passwords, pop up advertisements for fake antivirus software, or to create botnet computers that can be rented out to others.

Oracle, which manages the MySQL.com project, was still investigating the issue and unable to comment for this story Monday.

Highly trafficked open-source websites such as MySQL.com have been hit hard in recent months. In the past weeks the Linux Foundation was forced to take a number of websites offline, including Kernel.org and Linux.com after a compromise. And MySQL.com itself was hit earlier this year.

The hackers who hit MySQL.com in March posted a list of usernames and passwords after their hack, and that data may have been used to break into the site again, according to Maxim Goncharov, a senior threat researcher with Trend Micro.

In Russian underground forums, a hacker named sourcec0de has been shopping root access to the MySQL.com servers recently, Goncharov said. His price? US$3,000.

It's not clear whether sourcec0de really did have access to the MySQL.com website, but he did post screenshots that appeared to show that he had root access to the MySQL servers, Goncharov said in a blog posting.

Robert McMillan covers computer security and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Robert on Twitter at @bobmcmillan. Robert's e-mail address is robert_mcmillan@idg.com

Tags application developmentopen sourcesecuritysoftwaremysqlOracle

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Robert McMillan

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?