RFID "starter kit" is low-cost entry to asset management

You don't have to be a Wal-Mart or Johnson & Johnson to deploy RFID

Nowadays, you don't have to be a Wal-Mart or Johnson & Johnson to deploy RFID. A kind of "RFID starter kit" from Tego lets much smaller businesses exploit the latest generation of large-memory, programmable tags.

TegoDrive combines a Windows 7 application with about a dozen programmable TegoChip RFID tags, and a third-party USB tag reader, all for less than $1,000. The tags can have up to 32 kilobytes of configurable, and encryptable, memory. Using the PC application, you can drag and drop to the tags such items as component inspection reports, images, digital signatures, and other documents and data in common formats such as PDF, jpg, htm or txt. The amount of memory lets you track who "touches" a tagged asset, what changes have been made to it, or view details of an electronic shipping manifest.

In effect, TegoDrive adapts RFID for fewer, high-value assets, instead of the traditional large-scale deployments that require big software and hardware investments to track thousands or even millions of items, sasy Tim Butler, CEO and founder of Tego, Waltham, Mass. Tego, founded in 2005, designs and sells rugged RFID tags, the chip that goes in them, and systems software.

A Boeing aircraft mechanic, for example, could use a Tego tag to "read" a specific critical part or system on the aircraft, confirm that the information is up to date, pull data from the component and feed it into back-end systems, and see the history of who has accessed the part and for what purpose.

In a demonstration, Butler opened TegoDrive on a laptop, added an email attachment to the tag, viewed an inspection report from the tag in HTML format. The system can be set up to audit access to the tag's information.

The TegoDrive bundle is available in April. The vendor plans to release a stand-alone version of the Windows 7 application later, and a custom API that will let third parties integrate RFID readers and applications.

John Cox covers wireless networking and mobile computing for Network World.

Twitter: http://twitter.com/johnwcoxnww

Blog RSS feed: http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/2989/feed

Read more about anti-malware in Network World's Anti-malware section.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

John Cox

Network World

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?