MPAA files first suits against movie file-swappers

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) Tuesday announced that it has begun filing lawsuits against people who use peer-to-peer (P-to-P) software to trade movie files without permission over the Internet.

The MPAA filed an unspecified number of lawsuits in courts across the U.S., seeking damages and injunctions against the P-to-P users. Under the U.S. Copyright Act, people can be liable for as much as US$30,000 for each movie traded over the Internet, and as much as US$150,000 per movie if the infringement is proven to be willful. The trade group announced earlier this month it would begin to sue file traders.

The MPAA also announced it will soon offer to computer users a free program that identifies movie and music titles stored on a computer, along with any installed P-to-P software. The information collected by this program would be available only to the computer's user, according to the MPAA.

Users can ask the program to remove infringing movies or music files and any P-to-P software, the MPAA said in a press release.

"Our ultimate goal is to help consumers locate the resources and information they need to make appropriate decisions about using and trading illegal files," Dan Glickman, MPAA president and chief executive officer said in a statement. "Many parents are concerned about what their children have downloaded and where they've downloaded it from."

The MPAA also announced a new U.S P-to-P ad campaign, to be distributed to about 10,000 U.S. video stores. The Rated I: Inappropriate for All Ages video-store campaign is similar to an ad campaign that appeared in theaters, newspapers, magazines and on the Internet.

"Litigation alone is not the solution, but it is part of a broader MPAA effort that includes education and new technological tools among other components," Glickman said.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Grant Gross

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?