Oracle buys DataRaker for 'big data' analysis

DataRaker's products focus on analyzing smart-meter data from utilities

Oracle is planning to buy DataRaker in a move that will give it a cloud-based platform for analyzing data from smart meters used by energy utilities. Terms of the deal, which was announced Thursday, weren't disclosed.

Smart meters and the massive amounts of information they generate are frequently linked with the industry buzzword "big data," which typically refers to unstructured data formats. Oracle's pending acquisition of DataRaker ties into a broad movement by software vendors to sell products that customers can use to crunch these data sets for valuable insights.

DataRaker's technology will be combined with Oracle's application offerings for utilities, according to a FAQ document on the deal released Thursday.

It has a number of "high-performance, pre-packaged applications that can address many complex analytical challenges currently being faced by the utilities industry," according to the FAQ.

For example, DataRaker can help customers shorten the time it takes to handle calls, cut the number of field service appointments and give customers more personalized information, the FAQ adds.

DataRaker's staff will be rolled into Oracle Utilities. Its software is deployed at a number of utilities, covering more than 17 million smart meters, according to an Oracle presentation.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Tags business issuesapplicationsDataRakersoftwaredata miningbusiness intelligencedata warehousingMergers and acquisitionsOracle

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?