Another serious security hole in Microsoft IIS

Index Server is installed by default in all IIS (Internet Information Server) systems and is included natively in Windows 2000 and XP. The flaw comes into play in an ISAPI (Internet Services Application Programming Interface) extension associated with the Index Server, according to the company. If a certain kind of attack is mounted on a server running the software, the memory buffer can be overrun, giving the attacker control of the server, Microsoft said.

If Index Sever has been installed on its own, without IIS, there is no vulnerability, according to Scott Culp, security program manager at the Microsoft security response centre. However, the flaw is exploitable when the Index Server is present in conjunction with IIS -- which is the way most users will have it configured, Culp said. Even if the Index Server is disabled and IIS is running, the flaw is present, he said.

Microsoft issued a patch to fix the flaw at the same time it released the security bulletin containing the information. If users have been uninstalling unneeded software, as Microsoft recommends, those customers should not be vulnerable, Culp said. Users are presented with a checklist and an automated way to search for and uninstall unneeded components, he said.

Microsoft has spread word of the flaw to subscribers to its security notification service, industry analysts, IT security partners and others, Culp said. Additionally, some Microsoft customers are being contacted directly about the bug.

Monday's flaw is not the first to be found in IIS since the beginning of May. At least two such flaws have been found, one serious enough to allow an attacker to gain complete control of the affected systems. The first flaw also involved a problem with an ISAPI extension, this time one enabling Internet printing, and the second could have lead to Denial of Service attacks.

"The effect of successfully exploiting this vulnerability is just as serious" as the first ISAPI bug, Culp said, adding that though both exploited ISAPI extensions, the two flaws were not particularly related.

EEye Digital Security, the security firm who found the first ISAPI bug, also discovered this flaw.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sam Costello

PC World
Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?