Snapshot: Canon EOS 100D digital SLR

Canon’s EOS 100D is a pint-sized, entry-level DSLR camera

The trend these days in digital cameras is smaller, smaller, smaller — abandoning the tried-and-true formula of a digital SLR’s optical viewfinder and mirror box for a ‘mirrorless’ system that relies on an electronic read-out of what the camera’s seeing. This is what you get in cameras like the Canon EOS M, the Nikon COOLPIX A, and the Panasonic LUMIX GF5.

None

The new Canon EOS 100D bucks that trend; it’s still got all the bits and pieces you’d see on a high-end, professional digital SLR like the Nikon D600 or Canon 6D — most importantly that optical viewfinder — but it’s been shrunk significantly compared to any other D-SLR.

None

This camera is “the world’s smallest and lightest APS-C digital SLR”, and by a fair margin as well. Looking at it next to the superceded EOS 650D (which itself has been replaced by an EOS 700D), it’s 30 per cent lighter, and about 15 per cent smaller in overall dimensions — the EOS 100D is 117x91x69mm versus the 650D’s 133x100x79mm.

None

Like the 650D and new 700D, the EOS 100D has Canon’s perfectly competent 18-megapixel APS-C-sized CMOS imaging sensor, which can produce excellently-detailed digital photos even in dim lighting. You can compose pictures using the 100D’s optical viewfinder or its 3-inch touchscreen display, which doesn’t have any tilting or swivelling articulation like higher-end models.

None

You can also shoot Full HD video with the EOS 100D — and the camera comes with an 18-55mm zoom lens with a silent focus motor, so you can keep your videos crisply in focus while recording. Canon’s usual swathe of entry-level user guides and creative scene modes are built into the 100D.

Miniature Effect Creative Filter on the EOS 100D.
Miniature Effect Creative Filter on the EOS 100D.

Grainy Black and White Creative Filter on the EOS 100D.
Grainy Black and White Creative Filter on the EOS 100D.

Canon hasn’t said when the EOS 100D will be coming to Australia, or how much it will cost, but we know it’s on its way.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Campbell Simpson

Campbell Simpson

PC World

1 Comment

Doug Kennedy

1

If they had included an articulated screen and built in WiFi then it would have ticked all my boxes.

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?