Google's wearable computer faces bans even before Glass goes on sale

Businesses weigh a Google Glass ban, concerned that the wearable computers will be used to secretly film people.

Waltzing into a Las Vegas casino wearing Google Glass could be a risky proposition if staffers suspect you're using the wearable computer to surreptitiously shoot videos or photos.

Though Google Glass hasn't been officially released yet, some businesses are preemptively banning the wearable computers. Strip club owners told NBC News that patrons will be required to check Google Glass at the door, along with other electronics. Movie theater reps are concerned that the device will be used to record and sell bootlegged films.

But gamblers can breathe a collective sigh of relief: You won't be kicked out of a casino just for wearing Google Glass, said representatives for two of the country's biggest gaming companies, MGM Resorts International and Caesars Entertainment.

MGM owns several high-profile properties on the Las Vegas Strip, including the Bellagio, CityCenter, and MGM Grand. Caesars owns Caesars Palace, the Rio, and Planet Hollywood, among others. Your glasses will be safe at those properties, at least, unless a security guard suspects you're using the device to record footage.

"It has long been our policy that no unauthorized photography or videography is allowed in our casinos," an MGM Resorts spokesperson said via e-mail. "If a security officer suspects that a guest is filming, they will ask the guest to turn their devices off."

A Caesars spokesperson said Google Glass will be allowed on the floor, and people will only be asked to leave if they're suspected of using the device to secretly film.

So, basically, Google Glass will be treated the same as a smartphone or any other multi-functional device.

Few people are actually wearing the device in the wild, but one Seattle bar in March decided to ban Glass because its owner doesn't want his customers being secretly filmed. Meanwhile, lawmakers in West Virginia are trying to prohibit people from wearing Google Glass while driving.

Google Glass is still in development, so it's a little early for businesses or legislators to outline policies for or against it. Developers are still designing apps that are compatible with Google Glass, and Google recently held a contest to determine who would get a chance to test out the $1500 Explorer Edition of the glasses. That version is slightly different and likely more expensive than the product that will be released to the public toward the end of the year.

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Caitlin McGarry

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