Chromecast announcement doesn't kill Google TV, swears Google

The launch of the already popular Chromecast doesn't signal that Google will kill Google TV, the search giant said.

If Google TV was on life support before Chromecast arrived, the new media streaming device isn't prompting a pull of the plug — at least according to Google.

"With the exciting news about Chromecast we are getting a lot of questions mostly wondering if Google TV is dead," read a post on Google+ from the Google TV Developers.

"No, in fact partners are continuing to launch new Google TV-enabled HDTVs and boxes," the post said, reiterating that "the latest experience of Android and Chrome" is coming to more devices later this year. "We believe there is ample room for both products to exist and succeed," the post said.

Another post from Google TV employee Warren Rehman says that Google TV will get the Chromecast's "Cast" feature, which allows users to beam music and video from phones, tablets, and laptops to their televisions. (Even before the launch of Chromecast, this feature was already available for YouTube on Google TV.)

To top it all off, Sundar Pichai, Google's head of Android and Chrome, told CNet that Google TV is "moving forward in a major way," and that more partners will be announced at CES in January.

In other words, Google is pretty adamant that Google TV is sticking around.


Google TV does have a much broader scope than Chromecast, as it combines Internet video and traditional cable programming into a single, searchable interface. Chromecast, by comparison, is much more limited. For now, it can only stream Netflix, YouTube, and Google Play from phones and tablets. It can mirror any browser tab as well, but only from laptops and desktop PCs, and that feature is a work in progress.

Still, Google hasn't been able to convince the masses that a single interface for all of their television viewing is something that they need. Google TV is almost three years old, but has never been a commercial success.

One of Google's original partners, Logitech, abandoned the platform after the flop of its first and only product, the Logitech Revue. Other partners, including LG, Sony, and Vizio have offered Google TV in set-top boxes and televisions, but they continue to offer their own connected TV platforms as well. A claim by Google chairman Eric Schmidt that most televisions would use Google TV by mid-2012 has not panned out.

Meanwhile, Chromecast is already stirring up lots of demand. Amazon appears to have sold out of its stock, and the Google Play Store now lists a wait time of three to four weeks. Best Buy offers the dongle for in-store pick up, but has sold out of its online stock.

Chromecast's scope will only increase from here. Developers can build casting into their apps, which should be a lot easier than building an entirely separate app for Google TV. Google is also trying to build its own online TV service, and it's hard to imagine Chromecast not being a part of that.

As for TV integration, TV makers may decide they'd rather keep building their own Smart TV platforms instead of using Google TV, but include Cast features into their sets as an additional feature.

Although Google TV isn't dead, it now faces some serious competition from within the Googleplex. Google may claim that both products can co-exist, but it seems like just a matter of time until one gives way to the other.

Follow @TechHive on Twitter today.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags streaming videoInternet-based applications and servicesChromecastGoogleMusic and audioStreaming mediaGoogle TVinternetyoutube

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jared Newman

TechHive (US)
Show Comments

Cool Tech

D-Link PowerLine AV2 2000 Gigabit Network Kit

Learn more >

Crucial® BX200 SATA 2.5” 7mm (with 9.5mm adapter) Internal Solid State Drive

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

D-Link TAIPAN AC3200 Ultra Wi-Fi Modem Router (DSL-4320L)

Learn more >

ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q – Reign beyond virtual world

Learn more >

Gadgets & Things


Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Family Friendly

ASUS VivoPC VM62 - Incredibly Powerful, Unbelievably Small

Learn more >

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC™/SDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Best Deals on PC World

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.


Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?