Intel to ship open-source Galileo 2.0 computer soon

Intel's uncased Galileo computer is used to make robots, wearable devices and electronics.

Intel's Galileo board with Quark chip

Intel's Galileo board with Quark chip

Intel will ship the second-generation Galileo open-source computer soon, as the company tries to reach a larger crowd of enthusiasts and do-it-yourselfers.

Galileo is an uncased computer that sells for about US$70. The computer, which started shipping late last year, is being used to develop robots, wearable devices and small electronics.

Further details on the "second-generation" Galileo will be given during a speech Wednesday by Mike Bell, vice president and general manager of Intel's New Devices Group, at MakerCon in Redwood City, California, an Intel spokeswoman said.

The computer will ship sometime in the summer, Intel said, but the spokeswoman declined to provide additional details on shipment dates or specifications.

Galileo is much like the popular Raspberry Pi, but is based on the low-power x86 Quark processor. Intel has also shipped a smaller SD card-sized computer based on Quark called Edison, which can be used in wearable devices.

Intel is tapping into the "maker" community to figure out ways the Quark chip can best be used. Intel last month started shipping new Quark processors that consume less power and have features such as secure boot. Microsoft has also said that Windows OS support will be added to Galileo, but the current boards only run Linux.

The current Galileo board has a 400MHz Quark processor with 16KB of cache and 512KB of embedded RAM. The board is compatible with Arduino, a hardware and software package used to make electronics.

Slots and ports for mini-PCI Express, USB, Ethernet and Micro-SD are on the board. Other features include 8MB of NOR flash storage for the boot sector and an RS-232 serial port.

Agam Shah covers PCs, tablets, servers, chips and semiconductors for IDG News Service. Follow Agam on Twitter at @agamsh. Agam's e-mail address is agam_shah@idg.com

Tags hardware systemsintel

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Agam Shah

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?