MongoDB adds support option for community edition of its NoSQL database

The service provides as low as a two-hour response time, but leaves out the bells and whistles from MongoDB Enterprise

IT shops that want professional support for MongoDB without paying for the enterprise edition of the company's increasingly popular NoSQL database now have an option from MongoDB itself.

The company is offering support plans for running MongoDB's community edition in production scenarios, according to a blog post Monday.

"Over the past few years, we've heard from many users that they love our Community Edition, and wish there was a simple way to buy support for it," the post states. "Now there is."

MongoDB has decoupled the production support component from the enterprise edition and will provide it as a stand-alone service, according to the blog: "This means that Community Edition users now have access to our world-class team of support engineers."

The service includes around-the-clock access to support; as little as a two-hour response time, depending on the severity of the problem; and "proactive and consultative advice" from MongoDB engineers, according to the company's website.

The service is priced at US$250 per production server per month, while support for testing and quality assurance environments costs $125 per server per month.

However, it won't include features found in MongoDB's enterprise version, which include advanced security, on-demand training and easier integration with widely used system management tools, according to the company's site.

MongoDB Enterprise comes in two tiers, with Core costing $6,500 per server per year and Advanced priced at $10,000 per server per year. Additional licenses are required for servers containing more than 512GB of RAM.

MongoDB is currently the fifth-most-widely used database system in the world after Oracle, MySQL, SQL Server and PostgreSQL, according to a ranking system maintained on DB-Engines.com.

The company has made headlines in recent months by scoring sizable funding rounds and attracting key talent, including veteran Oracle database engineer Roger Bamford.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Tags open sourceapplicationsdatabasesMongoDBit strategysoftwarebest practicesIT management

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Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service

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