Microsoft acquires BlueStripe for operations management

BlueStripe will provide Microsoft System Manager with more nuanced performance metrics for distributed applications

BlueStripe technology, acquired by Microsoft, provides visibility into applications at the transaction level.

BlueStripe technology, acquired by Microsoft, provides visibility into applications at the transaction level.

To help enterprise customers better manage applications sprawled across hybrid clouds, Microsoft has purchased BlueStripe Software, a provider of technology for watching over distributed applications.

Microsoft plans to fold BlueStripe's software into its System Center and Operations Management Suite software for managing IT resources, giving users more details on how their applications are running on premise and in the cloud.

"BlueStripe's enterprise-class solution enables IT professionals to move from monitoring IT at the infrastructure level to gaining visibility into applications at the transaction level," Mike Neil, Microsoft general manager for the enterprise cloud operations, wrote in a blog post Wednesday.

Founded in 2007, BlueStripe offered software, called Fact Finder, that offers real-time monitoring of components of distributed applications, such as the database or application sever, no matter if it resides in house or on a public cloud service. It can alert administrators if a component is offline, or if it is working more slowly than expected. The software works by installing agents on each operating system that runs a component.

Companies such as SAS, AT&T, Unum Insurance, State Auto Insurance and Microsoft itself have used Fact Finder.

While it works to incorporate the software into its on management suites, Microsoft will discontinue sales of BlueStripe software. Current customers will continue to be supported.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is

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Tags business issuesMicrosoftmike neilMergers and acquisitions

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Joab Jackson

IDG News Service
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