EMC sells Syncplicity to focus on core storage business

Investment firm Skyview Capital plans to keep evolving the file-sharing system

EMC is selling its Syncplicity file-sharing and collaboration business to private investment company Skyview Capital for an undisclosed sum.

EMC bought Syncplicity in May 2012 in response to the growth of mobile computing and bring-your-own-device policies in enterprises. Syncplicity is one of a host of cloud-based file services, including Box, Dropbox and Google Drive, that have emerged in the past few years. It's available for iOS and Android as well as PC operating systems.

In the three years it owned Syncplicity, EMC adapted the system so enterprises could use it for access to data in their own storage systems. The company also added central controls over how specific types of files could be shared and with whom.

But continuing to evolve Syncplicity and keep it competitive in the file-sharing industry would divert EMC's attention from its core enterprise storage business, EMC said in a press release. The sale will help its storage division, EMC Information Infrastructure, focus its investments on that core business.

EMC will retain a financial interest in Syncplicity after the sale and will continue to sell Syncplicity as part of the EMC Select partner program, the company said. The deal is expected to close this month.

Skyview said it plans to invest heavily in Syncplicity and continue to enhance it. The purchase gives Skyview a chance to accelerate innovation and attract a broad ecosystem of partners and resellers, the investment company said.

EMC has expanded its scope well beyond its core enterprise storage systems business in recent years, becoming a "federation" of storage, virtualization (VMware), security (RSA Systems) and big data (Pivotal). That model has come under fire recently from investors who think the company should be split up.

Skyview, based in Los Angeles, has a small portfolio of technology companies that includes carrier network vendor NewNet, Tekelec Mobile Messaging and secure transaction processing company Traxcom.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is stephen_lawson@idg.com

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Tags business issuesInternet-based applications and servicesstorageSkyview CapitalSyncplicityinternetMergers and acquisitionsemc

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Stephen Lawson

IDG News Service
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