US govt guide aims to bolster security of mobile devices used in health care

The guide looked at what security risks pose the greatest danger to keeping patient data private

Health care providers are increasingly using smartphones and tablets for tasks such as accessing and transferring medical records, and submitting prescriptions, but these devices may not be secure enough to protect sensitive medical information from hackers.

That's the conclusion of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, whose cybersecurity center released a draft guide Thursday to help health IT professionals shore up the mobile devices.

"Mobile devices are being used by many providers for health care delivery before they have implemented safeguards for privacy and security," the agency said.

The guide provided thorough explanations on how to implement security procedures across a health care organization's entire IT system. For example, there are sections that describe how to connect Apple and Android mobile devices to a commercial mobile device management cloud platform. Step-by-step directions are provided on setting up a Linux-based firewall as well as on creating mobile device certificates, among other security technologies. The guide doesn't endorse a specific product and mentions open-source and proprietary technologies. The center used products that are readily available and can easily be integrated with an organization's existing IT infrastructure.

Another section of the guide looked at what security risks posed the greatest threat to keeping patient data confidential. Hackers gaining access to an IT system by exploiting weak passwords ranked as one of the top issues, followed by network sniffing and, perhaps unsurprisingly, stolen mobile devices.

The cybersecurity center also subjected a mock IT system to various security attacks and offered advice on how a health care organization could react to them. In one scenario, a mobile device that could access an EHR (electronics health records) system was lost. To mitigate the threat, the device was blocked from tapping into the hospital network and its data erased via a remote wipe.

Other scenarios showed how implementing access control for different systems could prevent hackers from getting to patient information even after they infiltrated a hospital network. In one example, a phishing attack was used to obtain system passwords and remotely log in to a desktop. In the second case, an unauthorized person, like a hacker or a rogue employee, obtained the password to an EHR system.

In both incidents, the credentials allowed intruders to see a network diagram. However, accessing the systems where sensitive data was stored wasn't possible since that action required administrator passwords and the attackers lacked those credentials.

Encryption was cited as a way to protect data even if an attacker gains physical access to a data center and taps into the network traffic.

The guide pointed out that implementing security must be balanced with making sure health care workers can easily use the technology to perform their duties. In emergency situations, work-around access controls maybe introduced so staff have immediate access to data.

The guide is open to public comments until Sept. 25.

Fred O'Connor writes about IT careers and health IT for The IDG News Service. Follow Fred on Twitter at @fredjoconnor. Fred's e-mail address is fred_o'connor@idg.com

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags securityhardware systemstabletshealth careindustry verticalsU.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Fred O'Connor

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Azadeh Williams

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

A smarter way to print for busy small business owners, combining speedy printing with scanning and copying, making it easier to produce high quality documents and images at a touch of a button.

Andrew Grant

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

I've had a multifunction printer in the office going on 10 years now. It was a neat bit of kit back in the day -- print, copy, scan, fax -- when printing over WiFi felt a bit like magic. It’s seen better days though and an upgrade’s well overdue. This HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 looks like it ticks all the same boxes: print, copy, scan, and fax. (Really? Does anyone fax anything any more? I guess it's good to know the facility’s there, just in case.) Printing over WiFi is more-or- less standard these days.

Ed Dawson

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

As a freelance writer who is always on the go, I like my technology to be both efficient and effective so I can do my job well. The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 Inkjet Printer ticks all the boxes in terms of form factor, performance and user interface.

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?