IBM pumps up its hybrid-cloud muscle with Gravitant buy

The Texas company's technology aims to make it easier to integrate mixed cloud environments

The hybrid cloud is widely expected to be a key force in enterprise computing in the coming years, so it's no wonder vendors are scrambling to bolster their capabilities on that front. Case in point: IBM on Tuesday bought Gravitant, a maker of brokerage software designed ease the purchase and management of software and services across mixed cloud platforms.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Founded in 2004, Texas-based Gravitant develops cloud-based software designed to make it easier for organizations to plan, buy and manage software and computing services from multiple suppliers across hybrid clouds.

In particular, its cloudMatrix brokerage software lets companies personalize IT service consumption and unify delivery through a self-service store, dynamic marketplace and continuous delivery engine. Users can review, compare and purchase compute and software services from different suppliers via a central console. Once purchased, the technology can be offered as a service and managed from the same place.

Equipped with those capabilities, companies can integrate mixed cloud environments and manage them digitally for better performance and efficiency -- or at least so the thinking goes. Among the benefits Gravitant touts are a 50 percent reduction in infrastructure and operation costs.

IBM now considers Gravitant's technology a key component of its expanding hybrid-cloud services, according to Martin Jetter, IBM's senior vice president for Global Technology Services.

The company plans to integrate Gravitant's capabilities into its Global Technology Services unit. IBM Cloud, meanwhile, will integrate them into its software-as-a-service (SaaS) offerings.

"While it's become increasingly apparent that enterprises are gravitating toward hybrid cloud, there are still challenges to effectively engaging and using those services," said Charles King, principal analyst with Pund-IT.

Among the issues businesses face are the need to assess the value of multiple cloud suppliers, develop centralized purchasing and management systems and understand how cloud services are being used.

"IBM clearly understands those points," King said. "Its acquisition of Gravitant should help to address them."

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags IBM

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Katherine Noyes

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?