Raspberry Pi Foundation merges with Code Club to benefit more youths

Raspberry Pi Foundation thinks beyond its tiny Linux-powered computers

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced a merger with the UK's Code Club in an effort to better reach out to young people with a message of making things with computers rather than just using them.

"Raspberry Pi Foundation and Code Club were both created as responses to the collective failure to prepare young people for life and work in a world that is shaped by digital technologies," according to a blog post on the Foundation's website.

Both outfits launched in 2012. Since then, the Foundation says it has sold 7 million of its teensy computers, the second major version of which debuted early in 2015. Raspberry Pi devices generally use Linux kernel-based operating systems.

Over the past few years, Code Club has helped to establish close to 5,000 volunteer-run clubs designed to help kids make things with computers.

But the organizations say they still have lots of work to do in enabling any kid in the UK, and beyond, to get involved in making things with computers. Code Club will operate as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Foundation. By merging with Code Club, the Foundation will be able to expand its focus beyond just Raspberry Pi.

Financial details of the deal were not disclosed.

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