Apple's CareKit gives you and your doctors a better understanding of your health

CareKit apps will help you monitor symptoms, medication, and treatment plans for a variety of medical issues.

CareKit is an open-source framework, much like ResearchKit, which will power apps that give you the ability to monitor symptoms, track medication, and stay on top of care plans following a surgery or medical diagnosis.

Each app will include a detailed Care Card, with instructions for diet, movement, medication, bandaging, physical therapy, and other treatment categories. The apps will provide weekly insights into your recovery—for instance, if you’re carefully monitoring your meds and entering that data in the app along with a pain score, you’ll be able to see whether the treatment plan you’re following is working.

“CareKit empowers people to take a more active role in their care,” said Apple Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams during Apple’s spring event on Monday. “The first CareKit app is for Parkinson’s. People can start understanding better what affects their heath.”

That Parkinson’s app is available today, and research institutes like University of Rochester Medical Center, UCSF, Johns Hopkins, and Stanford Medicine are already using it. More apps are coming, including the One Drop diabetes app, a chronic conditions app from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and a post-surgical care app from Texas Medical Center, so your doctors can adjust your recovery plan if they can tell from the app that it’s not going well.

The first slate of CareKit apps will hit the App Store in April.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags HealthKitResearchKitresearch

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Caitlin McGarry
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?