Australian fibre connections double in a year

ABS figures reveal that Australians downloaded 1.7 exabytes of data in the December quarter

The technology mix of the National Broadband Network has begun to tilt towards fibre to the node (FTTN), but figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal that fibre to the premises (FTTP) was the fastest growing Internet access technology in the 12 months from December 2014 to December 2015.

FTTP connections almost doubled during the period covered by the ABS’ latest Internet Activity report, growing from 324,000 to 645,000.

(NBN only launched its FTTN offering in September so the technology wasn't measured in the ABS release.)

DSL-based technologies declined slightly, while fixed wireless connections grew by a quarter and mobile wireless stayed steady.

Satellite also declined slightly and cable connections grew by just under 4 per cent.

The figures reveal that Australians downloaded 1.71 million terabytes — or 1.7 exabytes — in the three months ending 31 December 2015.

That represents an almost 50 per cent increase on the quarter ending 31 December 2014. Looking only at fixed broadband connections, downloads grew by more than 50 per cent during the period, from 1,112,379TB to 1,673,123TB for the quarter.

The ABS download statistics are based on figures from ISPs with more than 1000 subscribers. In total there were 12,853,000 Australian broadband connections, the report said.

NBN download growth outstripped the Australian average during the period, figures released by the company reveal.

At the end of December last year the average monthly downloads per end user on the National Broadband Network reached 112GB, representing growth of over 67 per cent from December 2014.

In addition, figures from NBN also reveal the average total uploads reached 16GB per user per month at the end of 2015.

“The significant increase in usage over the NBN network tells us the more bandwidth Australians have, the more content we want to consume,” NBN’s chief technology officer, Dennis Steiger, said in a statement.

“With forecasts showing the amount of connected devices is predicted to grow from nine to 29 by 2020, access to fast broadband will be critical in allowing us to continue to enjoy uninterrupted viewing on multiple devices at the same time.”

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags NetworkingNational Broadband Network (NBN)national broadband networkbroadbandTelecommunications

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Rohan Pearce

Rohan Pearce

Computerworld
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Crucial Ballistix Elite 32GB Kit (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 UDIMM

Learn more >

Gadgets & Things

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Family Friendly

Lexar® JumpDrive® S57 USB 3.0 flash drive 

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Plox Star Wars Death Star Levitating Bluetooth Speaker

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?