This Android Trojan blocks the victim from alerting banks

Symantec has noticed a “call-barring” function in a newer version of Android malware

A new Trojan that can steal your payment data will also try to stymie you from alerting your bank.

Security vendor Symantec has noticed a “call-barring” function within newer versions of the Android.Fakebank.B malware family. By including this function, a hacker can delay the user from canceling any payment cards that have been compromised, the company said in a blog post.

Fakebank was originally detected in 2013. It pretends to be an Android app, when in reality, it will try to steal the user’s money.

The malware works by first scanning the phone for specific banking apps. When it finds them, the Trojan will prompt the user to delete them and install malicious versions of those same apps.

The newer variants of Fakebank.B, however, will do more than just collect financial login data. They will also monitor whatever phone calls are made.

If the customer service numbers of certain banks are dialed, the Trojan will cancel the call, Symantec said. Instead, users will have to use email or another phone to reach their banks.  

So far, this new Trojan has only been detected in Russia and South Korea. Symantec is advising users refrain from downloading apps from less trustworthy sources, like third-party app stores.

The call-barring function shows how banking Trojans are continuing to evolve. Earlier this year, Symantec detected another kind called Android.Bankosy that can bypass voice-based two-factor authentication systems.

To do this, the Trojan will secretly activate call forwarding on the victim’s phone. All calls will then be redirected to the hacker’s own number.

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Michael Kan

IDG News Service
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