Android malware that can infiltrate corporate networks is spreading

DressCode has been found circulating in at least 3,000 Trojanized apps

An Android malware is spreading across app stores, including Google Play, and has the capability of stealing sensitive files from corporate networks.

DressCode, a family of Android malware, has been found circulating in at least 3,000 Trojanized apps, security firm Trend Micro said on Friday.

DressCode hides itself inside games, user interface themes, and phone optimization boosters. It can also be difficult to detect because the malicious coding only makes up a small portion of the overall app.

On Google Play, Trend Micro found more than 400 apps that are part of the DressCode family, it said. That's 10 times more than what security researchers at Check Point noticed a month ago.

Trend Micro added that one these apps on Google Play had been installed 100,000 to 500,000 times. Once installed, DressCode's malicious coding will contact its command and control servers and receive orders from its developers.

The malware is particularly dangerous because it can infiltrate whatever internet network the infected device connects to. Imagine a user bringing a phone to the office and connecting to the corporate network. The makers of DressCode could use the phone as a springboard to hack into the corporate network or download sensitive files, Trend Micro said.

"With the growth of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs, more enterprises are exposing themselves to risk via carefree employee mobile usage," the security firm said.

According to Trend Micro, 82 percent of businesses have BYOD programs, allowing their employees to use personal devices for work functions.  

The DressCode malware can also be used to turn infected devices into a botnet. This allows the infected devices to carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks or be used to send spam.

Trend Micro has found DressCode infecting enterprise users in the U.S., France, Israel, Ukraine, and other countries. The security firm is advising that users always check the online reviews for whatever apps they download.  

Users can also install Trend Micro's mobile security products to protect themselves.

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on the malware.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?